Jobster to serve Facebook exclusively — targets Craigslist

jobsterlogo.bmpJobster, the Seattle job search engine, armed with $50 million in financing and aiming to be profitable this year, announces two big moves tomorrow (Thursday).

First, it jettisons its comfy neutrality with other sites. Until now, it has remained a search engine, listing excerpts from job postings at Monster and CareerBuilder, and sending users to those sites to view the full postings. Going forward, Jobster will still do that. But it will also let employers post jobs at its site • and for free. It now becomes a direct competitor to Monster and CareerBuilder, but cheaper.

Second, it has signed a deal with Facebook to exclusively host the popular networking site’s career center. That’s huge, given Facebooks’ popularity among college students. If students start their careers with Jobster, the site can presumably win customer relationships for life.

Jobster’s move to free postings makes Jobster resemble Craigslist. Jobster has far less traffic than Craisglist. But it is more modern. Jobster offers users a way to tag themselves according to the jobs they’re seeking, upload resumes, photos and videos features, and create their own profile pages. Similarly, Jobster gives employers better ways to portray the candidates they’re looking for. If an employer posts a job with certain tag descriptions, the system pulls up the employees who have chosen same tags (see screenshot below). These profiles are separate Web pages, so they can be searched with an engine.

As reported, the three-year old company recently gutted its sales and marketing team, and instead has focused more on its online features.

It makes money by serving large companies with job-filling services, and plans to boost that business with traffic forwarded from the more robust Web site.

Chief executive Jason Goldberg told VentureBeat the site had a million unique users in January.

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