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When gamers lose their edge

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#*@!- It’s only a game

The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is such a useful tool into classifying what games are good and bad for children, or at least without a parent consultant. But have you ever notice on all the games online has that catch phrase: “Online interaction not rated by ESRB,” or something of that caliber. That’s all due to the friendly “jerks” that swear, talk trash, annoy, and at some points make threats to gamers.

We all swear, I am sure, on an occasion or pretty natural (like being frustrated at work). That’s fine. But what about people on, say, Xbox Live, who actually get so pissed off at a game (or the actually gamer) and make accusations of hacking into your account or “bullying” you into thinking they will come to your house and kick your ass?

What a damn joke this is.

I have a similar experience relating to that. I was playing Modern Warfare 2, and this older kid, say 27-years-old, was arguing with a kid that sounded like he was at the most ten. The little kid said he was better than the older player, and right then and there the argument ensues. These were two people on the same team. The guy snapped — he said he would come to his house, #@*! his mother, and then beat up the child.

All because the young one claimed he was better than him?


I can tell he wasn’t joking because I know probably half the people on Live joke around and act like idiots. But this sure-jackass was for real. This guy was on the edge — did he really just say that? This guy is for real? He’s that pissed off?

Forget beer muscles, this guy had the “headset muscles.”

So let’s go back to the beginning. They are both playing game. Let’s not forget that. This kid executed more kills than the other guys (I believe he was actually on the top of the ranks). So why, then, would a game that is supposed to be a fun experience, cause a human being to lose his temper, probably cry, and throw a tantrum?

I will be the first to admit that I became frustrated with a game on several occasions. Games like Oddworld and Tomba 2 are highly difficult games that push your buttons. The rewards for beating them sure felt like you just got out of hell, but still made you proud you actually beat it. But for gamers’ sake, try to avoid and be a complete bonehead just because you’re losing at a game.

“I’ll hack into your account, find you, and beat you up.” Save it, you lunatic. I suggest you go see anger management.

 

 

This is a scary part for parents that let their kids play online games. I don’t want to thrive on the whole “videogames cause violence” thing, but some of these kids get to hear online is an atrocity. The new EGM print magazine has a letter regarding wearing headsets and all. This is one of the reasons I don’t even bother talking to people on Live — someone will talk trash, make fun of your name, whatever.

How to do these people even have jobs if a videogame triggers such aggression? That’s one wonder. Maybe something bad happened to them in life and they need to take out their frustrations on the online community. It’s still no excuse to act with such behavior; it’s only game.

If a large majority of people’s behavior on Live is like this, it sure gives a bad reputation to our society, or at least a small portion of it. OK, maybe that’s too far. But the age of most of these people can really be embarrassing.

Ignore is one way to avoid. Probably the best tactic is just to mute him. That’s it. It’s that simple. I could care less what these people have a say; if you’re that damn annoying and acting like a complete assclown, you’re getting muted.

But are kids aware of these problems over the Internet?


 

 

 

I don’t feel the need to argue with someone I don’t even know. Sure, many online games today have scenarios where the best way to advance and win is with good communication. But if these people on Live don’t grow up and actually act their age, you better off finding people you know to play with.

It can ruin the enjoyment. I am sure many of you have encountered the same thing, so besides wasting your time and feeding into their bullshit, hit the mute button. It’s the only way to just sit back and play. Most importantly, you’re here for fun.


People hacking into your account is a whole other issue.

The fact that people will degenderize your profile, just because they despise you, is pathetic. It’s as if these kids need lives, education, and morals. Sometimes I wish it was like the good ‘ol NES/Nintendo 64 days — local multiplayer meant everyone having blast.


The next time you get on Live and experience such a travesty, just remember there’s a simple button to completely isolate yourself away from them. Gaming online is a great experience; however, it’s also full of good and bad people.  

Just remember: pick up the controller for the entertaining aspect, not a dispute with a couple of strangers.

Pictures from:


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distructoid.com
 

 


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