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Can new startup resu.me succeed in being the "LinkedIn killer?"

New career network resu.me launched today, saying it aims to be the “LinkedIn killer” for Generation Z users looking to find their dream job faster and easier, founder Karthik Manimaran told VentureBeat exclusively.

Resu.me uses machine learning to match candidates and jobs the way a  human recruiter might: By Googling a person to try to find out what they read, what they write about, what they seem to be passionate about — as well as who they interact with, what they say, their open source contributions, who’s in their network and so on.

The company said it will appeal to younger users by keeping its key focus on providing all the tools and incentives required to learn daily, build a portfolio and showcase better.

That will in turn help them connect with a meaningful network and ultimately land a job.

Resu.me uses semantic web technology to analyze and understand the relevance behind what users post online on their resumes, as well as from all other online activities such as code they share, blog posts they like, articles they read, what and where they comment and so on.

The site also learns from the feedback users provide in the form of “likes,” comments and ratings on other users, companies, job postings, or other social media.

The platform is directly linked to the web-based applicant tracking system of companies. As such, Karthik said users won’t have to mess around anymore with filling out redundant forms and waiting. It’s a “1-click application”, always fresh resume with a transparent scheme to track the application’s progress.

On the flip side, companies can also provide feedback and ratings on resumes and the matching algorithm adapts to it. It also offers an RSS feed reader, which tracks all that a user reads and shares online, and a tool to showcase user artifacts using Cooliris 3D wall.

The site then offers all the tools necessary to manage all these activities from one single place.

The two-year-old company currently has four employees and is entirely self-funded.

It aims to take on four separate categories of competitors: Professional networks like LinkedIn and Xing; job search engines such as Indeed and SimplyHired; job boards like Monster, Careerbuilder or Dice; and applicant tracking systems Taleo and Bernard Hodes.

But in such a crowded space, how will resu.me compete with such well-established groups and tempt the famously fickle Gen Z users into giving it a try?

Manimaran said primarily because it is a simple, one-stop platform for managing your resume in real-time and with a host of tools that make it more flexible and intuitive than its competitors.

“We came across practical difficulties hiring talent for our groups and also finding a job for ourselves,” Manimaran told me. “We wanted a tool that could help us manage our online professional profile in a much more elegant fashion that would help companies find us faster.”

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  1. […] four years of being a company, but it does seem extremely useful. Riley McDermid says in an article on VentureBeat, “Resu.me uses machine learning to match candidates and jobs the way a  human […]