Media

Redux steps into video distribution, teams up with Humble Bundle for Czech film “Kooky”

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Redux is aiming to move beyond the realm of web video aggregation with its new video distribution platform, which will allow artists to directly sell video on the web. The company has teamed up with Humble Bundle, the folks behind the popular indie game bundles, to give the Czech film “Kooky” its English-language debut.

Humble Bundle lets you set any price you want for its typical game offerings on its site, but to get access to Kooky (and a puzzle game “Windosill”), you’ll have to pay more than the average price (currently $8.80). Once purchased, you’ll be able to download Kooky, or stream it online in your browser, tablet, phone, or Connected TV, all of which is powered by Redux. So far, Humble Bundle has grossed almost $600,000 for the package of games and Kooky.

The company has so far focused on aggregating web video from sites like YouTube and Vimeo on its Web and tablet apps. Redux is also one of the few truly outstanding apps on Google TV 2.0.

It makes sense for the company to get into content distribution though, as we’ve seen big-name comedians like Louis CK succeed with direct-to-consumer specials. But the process to acquire CK’s web special was clunky — it basically involved downloading a file or streaming it to your browser. Redux’s platform gives you a smoother way to access such content across a wider variety of devices. And just like Netflix, you can start streaming a movie on your laptop, pause, and continue watching it on a tablet from where you left off.

Redux CEO and founder David McIntosh admitted that the new platform is a “philosophical shift” for Redux in an e-mail conversation with VentureBeat, but he added “when film-makers and comedians have approached us about distributing their video content to multiple platforms they don’t have anywhere to host it, so we have to take care of that problem for them.”

McIntosh says Redux will only host and stream content if an artist wants to charge for their content. He notes that in many recent content integration conversations, Redux has also been able to tap into existing digital content catalogs.

Redux is currently in negotiations with other artists for similar digital distribution offerings in the future, McIntosh says.

Berkeley, Calif.-based Redux raised around $1.65 million in seed funding for its first incarnation as a social network, but that product never ended up launching. The company has since raised an additional $4.5 million across two other rounds.

Check out the trailer for Kooky below: