Security

Veritrix takes authentication to the next level by recording your image and voice, gets $2.4M

Veritrix believes that you’ll only be able to truly “authenticate,” or know who’s logging into your system by physically identifying them. The company raised $2.4 million in a funding round today, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Chief executive Paul Headley is listed on the filing alongside co-founder Francine Gani, software engineer Karen Ma, and Lou Pambianco. We have reached out to Veritrix for more information on the round and will update the post upon hearing back.

It seems kind of obvious that you’d need to get the identity of a person to authenticate them into your system, right? That’s not necessarily true. Many authentication systems simply trust that you are who you say you are because you know the correct username and password combination, you can provide a special code is trusted to be only sent to you (as with two-factor authentication), or with the sturdier biometrics like fingerprints and iris scans. The problem is, biometrics technology is expensive and difficult to deploy, so much depend on the more traditional authentication models.

Veritrix’s software as a service product, which it calls the Sovay Sever, makes sure that the person logging in is really the person in the chair by taking video and voice recordings of the person to let them in. That is, you can your traditional login and password combination, but then the Sovay Sever will step in and make the person record a statement through the computer’s webcam. That way there is a log kept of every time a person accesses your system.

It’s a form of accountability. Veritrix hopes that this will deter anyone from going rogue on the inside, or anyone from the outside getting in.

There is also a management dashboard for IT departments to keep track of these logs.

Veritrix was founded in 2008 and is headquartered in Palo Alto, Calif.

Webcam image via Shutterstock

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