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PS4 will not lack diversions: Launching with 11 entertainment apps (but not HBO Go)

Above: Sony's PlayStation 4 console.

Image Credit: Sony

Sony and Microsoft are both launching new consoles this month, and while Microsoft built up the Xbox One early on as an all-in-one device, the PlayStation 4 is just as dedicated to nongaming features.

Sony Computer Entertainment revealed today that the PlayStation 4 will launch with 11 entertainment apps. That includes popular streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Instant Video. It also includes sports services like NBA Game Time and NHL GameCenter live.

Some big-name apps gamers won’t have access to on PS4 on day one include HBO Go and Flixster. Those apps will eventually hit the system, as will VidZone and an app from IGN.

Here is the full list of video apps the $400 PS4 will have when it launches on Nov. 15:

  • Amazon Instant Video: The online-retailers movie- and television-streaming app with 150,000 titles to rent.
  • Crackle: Sony Pictures Television’s free ad-supported app that features shows like Seinfeld and Damages.
  • Crunchyroll: An anime-focused app that brings popular Japanese shows like Naruto Shippuden to North America sometimes less than an hour after they broadcast in Japan.
  • EPIX: A Netflix like service with 3,000 titles.
  • Hulu Plus: The popular TV- and movie-streaming app that updates with current TV shows.
  • NBA Game Time: The National Basketball Association’s subscription service to get live out-of-market games.
  • Netflix: The popular streaming service that is moving into more original content.
  • NHL GameCenter Live: The National Hockey League’s out-of-market app.
  • Redbox Instant by Verizon: A Netflix competitor that works in conjunction with the physical Redbox renting kiosks.
  • VUDU: A renting service with the largest selection of HD movies and TV shows.
  • YuppTV: An Indian TV service that streams over 150 channels from that Asian nation.

Clearly, PlayStation 4 owners will have a lot to do on the console that has nothing to do with gaming, but the company is wisely choosing to present this fact as an added value on top of the console’s gaming-first nature.

That’s working, and this strategy is in contrast to how Microsoft first attempted to sell consumers on its next-gen console.

When Microsoft first debuted the Xbox One in May, the system suffered a backlash from gamers because Microsoft focused heavily on the device’s media features. The company explained how people will use the Xbox One to control their cable boxes and to keep up with NFL fantasy stats. These are interesting features, but gamers wanted to hear about the games first.

That’s how Sony did it, and it’s won them nothing but praise from gamers even while its media offering could potentially come up short in a head-to-head comparison with Xbox One.

More information:

Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. is a major video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, and is a wholly owned subsidiary and part of the Consumer Products & Services Group of Sony. The company was... read more »

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