Dev

Joyent rolls out commercial-grade support for the Node.js core

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At Node Summit today, Joyent execs announced the company’s latest offering: commercial support services for the Node.js core.

That means the Node-sponsoring company will be doing customer service for huge entities that use the Node codebase — “the official binaries and library APIs that comprise the runtime functions of Node.js” — and that run into problems and bugs while doing so. These entities will then have access to engineers that build the Node core for a living.

In case you’ve been living under the world’s largest and heaviest rock, Node.js is server-side JavaScript featuring non-blocking I/O and a single-threaded event loop. For the layfolks, Node is also one of the most popular open-source programming projects in the world and is quickly being adopted by large companies like Walmart and LinkedIn because it lets them process data and run applications much, much faster.

Joyent’s new offering, called Node.js Core Support, is slated to roll out in January 2014.

The service pricing starts at $990 per month and doesn’t have a free trial program. Features include access to Joyent engineers and support staff, including business hours for severity one incidents (i.e., when the system is down in every sense of the phrase), Node debugging and performance tools, a Joyent Cloud subscription, and 10GB of Joyent Manta Object Storage.

“Node.js has been a fundamental design choice for all of our products — The Joyent Public Cloud and its related components, including the customer portal and our Joyent Manta Storage Service, as well as our Joyent SmartDataCenter Private Cloud software,” said Joyent engineering SVP Bryan Cantrill in a statement on the news.

“We learned invaluable lessons while building these large distributed systems, and this new support offering reflects that expertise. As corporate stewards of Node.js, it is our duty to encourage and support developers who are building business applications in Node.js. That is how you build a very successful, collective ecosystem around an open source project.”

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