Project A backs encryption startup ZenGuard

Berlin-based company builder Project A Ventures today announced a six-figure investment in online security service ZenGuard. The news comes just one week after German media conglomerate Axel Springer announced a €30m investment in the company builder.

SaaS doesn’t mean what you think it means

Talk about agile development, technology acronyms may be the most nimble creations of the tech sector to date. From SaaS (software as a service) to PaaS (platform as a service), to IaaS (infrastructure as a service), what are we supposed to make from all of this? And is the acronym already obsolete?

Come explore the future of modern software with 40% off New Relic’s FutureStack conference

New Relic, the San Francisco-based leader in Software Analytics, is set to host their inaugural FutureStack conference in just one week from today. On Oct. 24-25, the Grand Hyatt San Francisco will be transformed by the sounds of 800+ disruptive developers, technologists and creatives, joining together to imagine, build and craft the future of Modern Software.

Denver vs. Silicon Valley: Where we’re better and where we need to grow

When I travel outside the Mile High City, I’m often asked what makes Denver so attractive for startups. While our tech community and the companies it’s home to are gaining traction by the month, the benefits of launching a startup in Denver aren’t necessarily as obvious as those associated with major tech destinations like the Valley and, more recently, New York.

Deutsche Telekom’s plan to thwart foreign spies: ‘No single byte leaves Germany’

Deutsche Telekom has announced a new plan to protect German internet traffic from international spying efforts post-NSA revelations.In August, Deutsche Telekom launched “Email Made in Germany“, an encrypted email service that only uses German servers to process and store all local email traffic. Now, the company wants to go a step further by working with other internet providers to introduce a so-called “National Routing” service. The service would ensure all emails and data packages sent locally do not leave German borders — at the moment, traffic is often rerouted via internet hubs in the UK or the US — WirtschaftsWoche reported on Saturday.Thomas Kremer, a board member of Telekom’s data privacy, legal affairs and compliance, told the magazine that “while being transported from the sender to the receiver in Germany, we want to guarantee that no single byte leaves Germany.”The plan is still being finalized. In order for Deutsche Telekom to achieve it, it’ll have to get the agreement of all its competitors, including Telefónica and Vodafone. WiWo reported that Deutsche Telekom’s next move could see the solution spread to cover the Schengen region of Europe.Germans were deeply concerned after documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden showed that Germany was as large a target for surveillance as Iraq and China, with half a billion phone calls, texts and emails investigated every month. Telekom’s solution does not, however, offer a way to prevent German secret service BND from accessing the communications – BND has already confirmed it has provided surveillance data for the NSA.