The addictive nature of games (mainly Candy Crush)

Fads in the mobile and online gaming industry have continuously increased with the use of Facebook and many other social media outlets.  Constantly, developers are attempting to find the easiest, most complex, addicting games that will bring in either a quick dollar or millions of dollars.  For example, the ever popular “Candy Crush Saga” created by King Games brings in an average $633,000 per day.  That per day analysis says something really interesting about the game.  Sure, a lot of what comes in is probably ad revenues, but something else that strikes me about games like these is the fact that there are ways to purchase currency and points through the game.  With just a dollar, you can buy enough “points” or other currency in the game to continue playing even after your lives have run out.

Irrational Games shutting down: What does it mean?

Irrational games, the major game studio behind the Bioshock games, is essentially closing down according to Ken Levine who says, “I need to refocus my energy on a smaller team with a flatter structure and a more direct relationship with gamers,” which basically means that he is laying off nearly everyone except 15 people. This is a very strange piece of news that I didn’t expect at all. Is it because Bioshock Infinite didn’t sell well? Is it because Ken Levine simply wants to take himself creatively somewhere else? It just leaves so many questions to be asked.

The Last of Us: Left Behind review

Left Behind reminded me why I loved The Last of Us so much. It was easily my favorite game of 2013, and possibly my favorite game of all time. When the first and final single-player DLC, Left Behind, was announced, I couldn’t wait to jump back into the incredible world that Naughty Dog created.

The Last of Us: Left Behind Review

The Last of Us took the video game industry by storm not because it did anything necessarily new but because it executed everything near perfect and was a great capstone to the last generation. Now with the downloadable content Left Behind, we focus on two aspects that we cut back and forth between: The in between time of the Fall and Winter seasons of the original game and a brand new time frame before the story of Joel and Ellie, her friendship with Riley. The game plays virtually the same as The Last of Us as expected, the same refined 3rd person shooting and stealth tactics that made the original game so great. But what surprises me the most is how much the downloadable content didn’t focus on combat. There isn’t a whole lot of combat in general throughout until the climax which actually makes the entire thing much more effective.

Kickstarter: A Question of Experience

Author UnSubject over at his blog, Evil As A Hobby, scrubbed through video game labeled Kickstarters spanning 2009 – 2012 and assembled the data into a compelling look at the extremely low rate of follow-through made by over 366 projects. It’s a great article that has encouraged quite a bit of discussion both there and across the ‘net.

Why was Flappy Bird so popular?

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past few weeks, you’ve heard all about Dong Nguyen’s viral mobile game, Flappy Bird. You’ve probably also heard that he took it down after it became “too addictive.” But why is it exactly that a simple game like Flappy Bird became so popular?

History Behind The Game – Ryse: Son of Rome

It’s been an extremely long time since I dusted this feature off from the shelf and with the Rome inspired action game, Ryse: Son of Rome, releasing for Xbox One, it was a perfect opportunity. Ryse is a game so rich with historical figures and events that you begin to really wonder if these people and things in the game really were true. That’s where ‘History Behind The Game’ comes in. Let me be your guide as we fill in the gaps.