Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot embraces disruption, new business models and new platforms (interview)

Yves Guillemot, the chief executive of French game publisher Ubisoft, belives that traditional game companies will be able to meet the challenge of the changing game business, which is being disrupted with new business models and platforms. Ubisoft’s position is to create as many games as it can at the beginning of new platforms, establish a foothold, and then monetize the market with sequels after the new platform becomes established. We caught up with Guillemot on Sunday for an interview. Here’s an edited transcript.

The DeanBeat: What to expect at E3

Expectations are mixed for the video game event of the year, the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) conference taking place in Los Angeles next week. We’ll have a crew of 10 GamesBeat writers and editors physically covering the event, so you know that we believe the show is still a relevant place to catch up on all things gaming related. We’ll be posting as often as we can on the GamesBeat channel of VentureBeat. Naysayers say it will be boring, or a museum of gaming’s past. But that’s a crock of … you know.

The DeanBeat: GamesBeat 2012 to focus on crossover strategies

GamesBeat 2012 is going to be all about crossover strategies. The game industry as we know it is changing. We’re seeing established companies cross over from one market to another, where once they faced barriers. As companies adapt to change, we are witnessing disruption, change, consolidation, innovation, and the arrival of big money. We’re talking billions of dollars that are at stake.

The DeanBeat: How developers can avoid a bloodbath in fighting for new users

In the past month, what app makers have to spend to get the attention of Apple device users has risen out of control. That’s a tough fact of life that could make survival hard in the Darwinian mobile app ecosystem. Solving this problem is going to require a lot of innovation and clear thinking. And if it isn’t solved, we’re going to see a number of mobile app companies start to die. If Apple and others in the ecosystem don’t handle it right, it could be a bloodbath for developers.

Neil Young’s path to the multibillion-dollar mobile social game market (interview)

Neil Young sold his San Francisco startup Ngmoco to Japan’s DeNA for $403 million in the fall of 2010. And that was just the beginning of Young and DeNA’s quest to create a multibillion-dollar mobile entertainment group, he told VentureBeat last year. DeNA, with $1.4 billion in revenues in the last year, has already cleared many hurdles on that path. Ngmoco has integrated its NG Core technology with DeNA’s Mobage social mobile gaming network to create a new platform for smartphone entertainment.

OpenFeint’s single sign-on for social games to replace Apple’s UDID (exclusive)

Apple caused panic among app developers last week when it announced that it would phase out an identification system for users on its mobile devices such as the iPhone. Mobile gaming company OpenFeint says it will help solve the problem created by the elimination of this feature by offering its own “single sign-on” identification system for app developers.