America, keep rewarding your dissidents

Ever since I became an academic six years ago, I have been one of the biggest critics of U.S. competitiveness policies. I documented, for example, that we had our data wrong when it came to India and China’s advantages in engineering education and R&D, that we didn’t understand how to build innovation centers, and that our assumptions about entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship were wrong. I have been particularly vocal about America’s flawed immigration policies. I quantified the amazing contribution that skilled immigrants make in the technology industry and raised the alarm about the reverse brain drain that is in progress. I testified, assertively, to Congress, and have been badgering our political leaders to act on these important issues.

After 10M downloads in 1 year, Scan gets $1.7M from Menlo and Google Ventures to perfect QR codes

Like most people, Garrett Gee thought the experience of creating and using QR codes kind of sucked. “They were not visually appealing or user friendly,” he told VentureBeat. So as a sophmore at Bringham Young University in Utah, Gee and few friends created their own iOS app, Scan, to help users create and interact with QR codes. 10 million downloadsand less than a year later, and the startup has scored $1.7 million in funding from big names like Menlo Ventures, Google Ventures, Yuri Milner’s Start Fund, Social + Capital Partnership, and Lady Gaga manager Troy Carter.

The 7 ‘creep factors’ of online behavioral advertising

The flood of news stories on the data-collection and online behavioral advertising (“OBA”) practices of search engines, mobile apps, brand advertisers, and social networks is giving many people a very distinct feeling: the creeps. Whether the stories are about concerns over Facebook sharing its users’ profile details with advertisers, Google bypassing default browser settings, or Target figuring out a teenager is pregnant before her parents do, the natural reaction is to picture the companies’ employees as shadowy, green-eyed peepers crouching in the darkness.

New privacy policy agreement forces apps to disclose data use

California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris has struck a privacy agreement with the top six companies she believes facilitate the creation of the most mobile applications: Apple, Google, Hewlett-Packard, Amazon, Microsoft, and Research in Motion. The agreement states that all mobile apps that collect any sort of personal information must create and distribute a privacy policy.

HTML5 vs. native apps: How to pick the right path

The mobile technology landscape is incredibly confusing. There are numerous choices, ranging from new HTML5 technologies, native app development methods, and all sorts of content management systems. At CBS Interactive, we have numerous mobile solutions, including native apps for CBS.com, CNET, and “60 Minutes,” along with mobile-optimized Web sites for GameFaqs and global properties like ZDnet. At first blush, it seems problematic…

Megaupload founder out on bail, banned from Internet and helicopters

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom was released on bail Wednesday in New Zealand, after a judge ruled he was no longer a flight risk. Dotcom is not allowed to access the Internet while out on bail, and he cannot use a helicopter. Additionally, he’s confined to his Coatesville house, where police took him into custody last month after finding him in a safe room with what appeared to be a sawed-off shotgun.