Why incentives and rebates work better than ‘government-backed green’

Remember Solyndra? The thin-film solar cell company, founded in 2005, won $535 million from the government under the Department of Energy’s  loan guarantee scheme in 2009 for being an innovative new solar tech company that could create jobs and help make America’s future green. Two years later, when its technology was beaten by a cheaper competitive technology, it filed for bankruptcy and laid off 1,100 people.

Motorola’s Atrix HD: A high-end phone with a low-end price tag (review)

While Motorola’s Droid Razr and Droid Razr Maxx are two of the best phones around now, the pair has, sadly, been available only to customers of Verizon. That’s changing today with the release of the Atrix HD, a phone that borrows heavily from both of its predecessors, while somehow managing to stay really cheap. That’s no small feat, and it makes the Atrix HD the type of device that demands your attention and consideration.

What to do when our laws can’t keep up with our innovation

A 63-year old Vietnam veteran who was rendered completely disabled during service to his country was able to travel again because of a custom-made mobile-assistive device. But in October 2009, as he traveled from Miami to San Juan, Puerto Rico, the 450-pound device was damaged in the cargo hold of the plane. As a result, the vet was bedridden for more than nine months. The airline accepted responsibility for the damage but offered a tiny settlement — just to repair the device. It argued argued that his device was like an automobile or a wheelchair, so the airline’s only liability was to repair the device.

VBWeekly: Digg dumps, Githubs gits, Ouya owns, and Nukotoys … toys?

Yes, folks its another VBWeekly, and our regular VBWeekly host Jolie O’Dell was out on assignment, so VentureBeat’s executive Editor Dylan Tweney has stepped in to take you through the stories of the week. And we have stories; running from Digg dumping itself for a bit of a loss for its investors, to Github grabbing investor money. Lots of it.  Also we replay a section of the interview we did with Yves Behar of Ouya and have a look at a pretty interesting little iPad game from Nukotoys.

Venuetastic launches 2.0 to help party planners pinpoint perfect venue

Event planning resource Venuetastic has launched a 2.0 version that makes it easier than ever for event coordinators to scout and book the perfect venue. The site lists over 5,000 hand-picked event spaces in six cities across the US and targets everyone from professional event coordinators throwing large-scale events to Moms searching for a birthday party spot.

How Bleacher Report is preparing for Olympic-sized web traffic

Bleacher Report is the third-most visited sports website in the U.S., behind massive brands ESPN and Yahoo Sports (both backed by huge corporations). You don’t get to millions of monthly visitors and peak traffic of 80,000 page requests a minute by ignoring scalability. But the soon-to-be-live 2012 London Olympics promises to triple the independent site’s pageviews.

Madefire demonstrates why digital comic books should come alive at Comic-Con

Any knowledgeable fan of graphic fiction will tell you that Americans are responsible for making comic books popular, but it was a handful of Brits in the ’80s and ’90s that demonstrated their full potential as a storytelling medium. And if history is any indication, the same thing may happen in digital comics, thanks to newly launched iPad app Madefire.