The DeanBeat: Will your game company survive the zombie apocalypse?

The Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) video game trade show in Los Angeles was full of glitzy press conferences (like Ubisoft’s, pictured above). So many big companies were acting like it was business as usual. They showed games that were the third or fourth in the series on the same generation of game consoles. One very well-known game developer came up to me and said, “I wonder if any of this is going to matter. There is so much change happening in the industry that is going to make this all irrelevant.”

How Thatgamecompany designed its new game, Journey

Kellee Santiago is co-founder and president of Thatgamecompany, the Santa Monica, Calif.-based game studio she started with Jenova Chen. After three years of work, the company’s Journey game on the PlayStation 3 will go on sale as a downloadable title on the PlayStation Network on March 13. The game has already gotten accolades from game critics, including a high rating of 90/100 from GamesBeat. In the game, the player goes on a solitary journey across the desert to a distant mountain. The visual effects of the wind and sand are beautiful, and the story is told without any words.

Journey will take you into the cloudy heights of video game artistry (review)

Your first words when you start playing Journey, the new PlayStation Network game from Thatgamecompany, will be something like “Wow,” or “Cool!” From the moment you start walking through the sand, you know you’re in for a different kind of experience. The sand is mesmerizing, and since there is nothing else to do but walk through it, it captures your full attention.

An interview with Journey co-creator Jenova Chen (video)

We are still showing off all of the goodies we saw at the E3 trade show last week in Los Angeles, where 45,000 attendees got their first look at the video games of the future. At the Sony booth, we caught up with Jenova Chen, co-founder of Thatgamecompany and co-creator of Journey, one of the best games at the show. Amid the noise of E3, you can hear in Chen’s own words the thinking behind the game while VentureBeat’s Matthew Lynley plays it in the background.

VentureBeat’s photo gallery captures the noise of E3 2011 (part 1)

The only thing bad about an E3 photo gallery is that you can’t hear the sounds. E3, the video game industry’s trade show, is an extremely loud trade show, with game exhibitors blasting sounds as much as they can to draw attention to their games. The convention drew an estimated 45,000 people to Los Angeles this week. We were there from the first parties to the last. We saw many of the 35,000 screens showing off new games. Here’s the show in pictures.