Zynga is vastly undervalued

How can a company that brings in $1.2 billion a year, and recently cut costs in order to achieve profitability, have a market value that’s effectively zero? It doesn’t make sense. Here’s why Zynga is undervalued — provided it does the right thing next.

Has adaptive design failed? Of course not

Yesterday morning I read Peter Yared’s provocative article, ‘What’s next for mobile now that adaptive design has failed?’ which is based entirely on the misassumption that mobile users don’t scroll. If that were true, the reasoning might be valid, but it’s not. It’s utter nonsense.

What’s next for mobile now that adaptive design has failed?

[Update: This article was written for business readers. Due to an outcry from the responsive design community after this was published, I added the word "web" to the term "adaptive design" to avoid confusion with progressive enhancement, and updated the text to read that Facebook uses "a precursor to" responsive design, even though very techie trades like RWW say that Facebook uses responsive design. Obviously, the outcry has more to do with the content than the terminology, but it's always good to be pedantic. Read on!]

HTML5 vs. native apps: How to pick the right path

The mobile technology landscape is incredibly confusing. There are numerous choices, ranging from new HTML5 technologies, native app development methods, and all sorts of content management systems. At CBS Interactive, we have numerous mobile solutions, including native apps for CBS.com, CNET, and “60 Minutes,” along with mobile-optimized Web sites for GameFaqs and global properties like ZDnet. At first blush, it seems problematic…

Why Time Warner should reacquire Aol

Aol released its earnings today a week after Time Warner, its former dot-com merger partner, announced earnings. The two businesses, once considered completely disparate and deemed one of the worst corporate mergers of all time, are now increasingly complementary as the industry shifts beyond delivery mechanism to content as the value differentiator.

Just like Google and Facebook, Twitter now charges brands to reach their own customers

You know a web service has reached massive scale when it can charge brands to reach their own customers. Google has been doing it for years, Facebook’s been at it for the past couple of years, and now Twitter has just entered this hallowed territory with its new promoted tweets feature, which lets brands keep their tweets alive in your stream only if you have already followed that brand. The irony here is that you are only seeing these promoted tweets if you already followed that brand – so the brand is paying to advertise to users that already like it.

How the carriers screwed themselves out of mobile payments

There has been a huge scrum amongst the smartphone players to capture the market for phone-based purchases. In a very surprising move, the major US-based carriers just folded their mobile payments hand, and folded it hard. Isis, the mobile payment system sponsored by Verizon, AT&T and TMobile, announced that it had signed deals with Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover to its touch and go payment systems.