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Location:San Francisco, CA

stories by Giancarlo Valdes

E3 2012 awards: Day three

Alas, all good things must come to an end: the Electronic Entertainment Expo wrapped up its festivities at the L.A. Convention Center early Thursday evening. Booths were dismantled, journalists flew home, and here I am, my eyes tearing up at the lack of press conferences to make fun of for at least another year. A sad time for all of us, I'm sure. 

E3 2012 awards: Day zero

I know, I know, the last thing you want to see is yet more analysis on the crap ton of gaming news from this year's Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3). Hundreds, if not thousands, of people on the Internet have already expressed their excitement or discontent over what they've seen. 

E3 2012 awards: Day one

The second day of news (but the first full day on the show floor) from the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) has come and gone, so it's time once again to dole out a few awards. On Tuesday, Nintendo was the last of the big three publishers to host their annual E3 press conference, with all the stilted dialogue and scripted performances that you could hope for. So let's get down to business!

DayZ: How an ARMA II mod took the PC world by storm

Though the wound was gushing with blood, I couldn't stop. I had to keep on running. Gravel and dirt were crunched into a fine mist underneath my tireless feet. The siren call of the undead was nearly impossible to ignore, even amid my own desperate gasps for air. Colors faded away as my vision blurred, and I lost all sense of direction. My world was rapidly careening into madness, and it wasn't long until my body collapsed from sheer exhaustion.

My 3.5 year journey through Fallout 3

November 2008 marked the first time I ventured out into the Capital Wasteland, armed with little more than a BB gun and a handful of stimpaks as I began the search for my deserted father. Three years and five months later — after countless battles with Ghouls, the Enclave, Super Mutants, Deathclaws, and other mutated freaks — my journey finally came to an end.

Review: Hero Academy fills up a dark, empty void in my life

There’s something deceptively seductive about tactical role-playing games: instead of the instant-gratification of combat seen in other genres, tactical RPGs requires patience and careful calculation from the player as they move each of their warriors from one square block to the next. Trying to second-guess your opponent’s moves adds another layer of strategy, as even a slight misstep could spell game over at any moment.

Review: Beat Sneak Bandit ushers in a new genre of Tactical Rhythmic Action

Rhythm games are somewhat of a rare creature in the video game industry; even with the successes of Harmonix's Rock Band and Activision's Guitar Hero franchises in the last few of years, the genre has failed to spread much beyond the pseudo-band experience. And while there have been a few excellent titles for the Nintendo DS (Elite Beat Agents comes to mind) and the PlayStation Portable, I’ve been more impressed by the small but growing number of quality rhythm games for iOS devices — and Simogo’s Beat Sneak Bandit is the best entry there by far.

This is the remix: why we need more games like Mari0 in our lives

At first glance, it seems like a logical thought-process: take two celebrated games and their mechanics and mash them up to deliver an even better game. After all, fully-developed, AAA-quality crossover games are nothing new: we have the Marvel vs. Capcom franchise, Nintendo's Super Smash Bros., and more recently, Street Fighter X Tekken (incidentally, all of which are fighting games).

Rebuilding the old world, one Fragment at a time

When you find yourself alone at the end of the world, not knowing what sort of catastrophic event destroyed nearly everything and everyone you knew, wondering about how much money you have should be the last thing on your mind. Thankfully, the developers at Supergiant Games avoided resorting to simple monetary values that would clearly have no worth in Bastion’s post-Calamity Caelondia. Instead, they incorporated bits and pieces of the old world into the new one. Known as Fragments, these small blue stones are relics of the past that act as the Kid’s primary form of currency throughout the game.

An unexpected dinner with Twisted Metal’s David Jaffe

It was 10 p.m. on a cold night in San Francisco, and David Jaffe was hungry. He hadn’t eaten since his arrival to the city earlier that day when he was busy preparing for the night’s festivities. Sony was hosting a Twisted Metal community meet-up and multiplayer tournament at the swanky Mezzanine lounge. Jaffe was there, along with a few other members of his team, to promote the game.