Mind the facts: Quick tips to stay vigilant while reading news

It’s easy to become caught up in tweets or Facebook posts alleging a story is true when there is very little to back it up. Recent events like the Boston Marathon bombing and fertilizer plant explosion in Texas incite a swarm of incorrect information including photos, videos, and stories. It’s important as a consumer of news to be able to determine what’s fake and what actually happened.

As legal battle with TV networks escalates, Aereo launches in NYC — We tested it, and it rocks

I’m sitting in my office (by which I mean my kitchen) watching Rachel Ray on my iPad and Kathy Lee on my laptop. These aren’t clips or day or old episodes. It’s live programming that’s streaming to me via Aereo, the web TV service locked in a legal battle with the big TV networks, which launches to the public in New York City this morning.

Aereo says people have a legal right to rabbit ears and DVRs, countersues the big TV networks

Aereo, the New York startup that is building a new system for streaming and recoding live TV, is countersuing the big TV networks that filed a lawsuit against it at the beginning of this month. The company, which is backed by local investors like First Round Capital and Barry Diller’s IAC, says that the courts have already ruled in favor of their technology, just not in this innovative new form.

Streaming service Aereo ready for legal war with TV networks

Incumbent industries have a history of challenging new technologies that disrupt the established way they do business. For example, AT&T sued to keep everything from the answering machine to the Hush-A-Phone out of the market. Yesterday’s news that all the major TV networks are filing suit against streaming TV service Aereo is the latest in a long line of battles about how technology evolves. And Aereo, which recently raised $25 million from backers that include billionaire Barry Diller’s IAC, is ready for a war.