After OnLive: Here’s why Nvidia believes cloud gaming is just getting started (interview)

After cloud gaming leader OnLive ran out of money in August, the future of cloud gaming became, er, cloudy. Rival cloud gaming service Gaikai had sold itself to Sony for $380 million, but OnLive’s failure to gain enough consumers to offset the costs of its cloud infrastructure raised questions about whether cloud technology was economical for games. Cloud gaming let a user play a high-end game on a low-end PC simply by logging into OnLive, which executed games in web-connected data centers that computed the game and sent images to the user’s machine in real time. OnLive launched in 2010, but too few subscribers materialized. Surrounded by free-to-play games, OnLive tried to sell consumers on instant access to the cloud and the capability to log in from any machine.

Weaker Q2 tech earnings could make investors jittery

Earnings season starts this week for tech companies, and no one is expecting outstanding second-quarter results. If the reports turn out to be weaker than expected, then tech investors might run for the hills, the San Jose Mercury News reported.

Chip makers form group to save power in hybrid processing tasks

Advanced Micro Devices used its developer event today to kick off a new consortium dubbed the Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA) foundation to create industry standars that enable more power efficient processing that combines tasks performed by graphics processing units (GPUs) and central processing units (CPUs).

GamesBeat Weekly Roundup

If you follow VentureBeat but don’t regularly check our GamesBeat site, here’s a list of the best games stories we ran over the last seven days that you may have missed.

GamesBeat Weekly Roundup

If you follow VentureBeat but don’t regularly check our GamesBeat site, here’s a list of the best games stories we ran over the last seven days that you may have missed.

AMD beats expectations but accounting write-off leads to a huge $590M net loss

Chip maker Advanced Micro Devices reported today that its first quarter results beat expectations, but the company had a big loss of $590 million. While AMD is very competitive with its product line-up, the results show that it’s not easy to keep waging in the unending war with Intel, the world’s biggest chip maker. Worth noting is that the loss is due not to operations but to an accounting charge.

In the post-PC future, businesses will use notebook and tablet hybrids

Many have speculated that we’ve crossed the chasm to the Post-PC era, and that the PC as we know it will be relegated to niche-market status. While it is true that many more smartphones are sold each year than PCs, and that tablets are increasing market share rapidly, I believe business users and many consumers are still not in a post-PC era.

AMD pumps extreme performance into mid-range computers with 1-gigahertz Cape Verde graphics chips

Advanced Micro Devices is rolling out new graphics chips today that will bring screaming performance to the mid-range of the gamer PC market. The new AMD Radeon HD 7700 series (code-named Cape Verde) has a lot of the same technology as AMD’s code-named Tahiti graphics chip, which debuted in December as the world’s fastest graphics chip. But the 1-gigahertz-capable 7700 chips will be built into graphics add-on cards that cost only $99 to $199.