Ubisoft’s creative director on why hooded assassins still fit in the American Revolution (interview)

Alex Hutchinson is the creative director on Assassin’s Creed III. The game is one of the biggest video games of the year, and Hutchinson’s job is to make sure that the creative vision of the game captures the imagination of gamers, who are getting new Assassin’s Creed games every year. We talked to him about everything from why the assassin, Connor, will still be wearing a hooded costume in We caught up with him on Sunday for an interview. Here’s an edited trancript of our chat.

4 things you won’t see in Assassin’s Creed III

At the premiere event for Assassin’s Creed III, freshly minted franchise Creative Director Alex Hutchinson took a break from unveiling a game we want more of to pull back the curtain slightly on a game that will never be. “You tend to play the first draft of a video game,” says Hutchinson, but he intends to deliver something a few revisions down the line. By way of proof, he showed us a four things that didn’t survive the first round of edits.

This week on Xbox Live: Expansions for Battlefield 3, Assassin’s Creed Revelations, and Gears of War 3

Microsoft has expanded Xbox Live to enable new entertainment options such as YouTube and Verizon’s FiOS TV, but the bread and butter of the Xbox 360 remains games. This week will see a slew of attention-grabbing new content on Xbox Live for some of the year’s biggest titles. Battlefield 3 finally gets its Back to Karkand expansion, available for $15, or free to those who purchased the Battlefield 3 Limited Edition retail package. Gears of War 3 kicks off its 12 Days of Gearsmas celebration with the RAAM’s Shadow campaign. You can read my review here. I didn’t like it. And Assassin’s Creed Revelations receives the first of several content bundles with the Ancestors Character Pack, which adds a few new faces to the multiplayer.

Review: Ezio’s not the only thing getting old in Assassin’s Creed: Revelations

Assassin’s Creed: Revelations is the fourth title in Ubisoft’s award-winning, multi-platinum franchise. Developed by multiple internal studios around the globe and spanning more than 400 individual team members, the Assassin’s Creed series needs to sell better than most in order to offset its undoubtedly massive production costs. But can Ubisoft sustain such an ambitious annual business model while still keeping the sequels fresh and compelling?