Tap it out: Foursquare for BlackBerry updated with NFC support

Check-in service Foursquare is helping its BlackBerry fans bridge the cross-platform communication gap, enabling them to exchange tips, lists, venues, and profiles with friends by way of near field communication support in the newest version of its BlackBerry app.

Struggling RIM hires a law firm to assist with restructuring

Research In Motion, the company behind the ailing Blackberry platform, has hired a law firm to help it with a company-wide restructuring plan aimed at making the company profitable again. The plan could include selling off resources, seeking joint ventures, or licensing its patents.

How RIM could save itself: With a “super feature phone”

Research In Motion is reportedly attempting to sell itself after rejecting the former co-CEO’s plan to open up its network to carriers. But for some reason it is not pursuing the creation of a lucrative category between smart phones and feature phones — the super feature phone.

The forecast for RIM: cloudy, with a chance of success

There is no doubt RIM’s fortunes have been receding of late. The share of BlackBerry smartphones in North America is plummeting (although still strong in other parts of the world) and revenues are down. Competition is fierce. Can new management and stated objectives for future products at RIM turn things around or is it too late?

Wal-Mart

How Walmart can save the BlackBerry

BlackBerry maker, Research In Motion, recently released disappointing Q4 2012 financial performance results. New CEO Thorstein Heins has acknowledged RIM is in need of significant changes if it is to survive, much less stay relevant. The odds are heavily stacked against RIM at this point, but there are still things the company can do to regain its footing in the market.

Thorsten-Heins-RIM-655

New RIM CEO: We need substantial change

On his first-ever earnings conference call, newly christened Research in Motion CEO Thorsten Heins seemed to come to terms with the bad hand he’s been dealt and admitted that the company was in need of “substantial change.”

OWS Phone

Apps for occupiers make organizing, communicating and sharing easier

The smartphone has been at the center of the Occupy Wall Street movement, just as it has played a pivotal role in the Arab Spring. And while the cameras in phones have recorded some of the movement’s most searing images, a growing number of apps are helping protest participants communicate and coordinate with one another.