RIM exec begs CEOs to shape up, but RIM doesn’t seem to care

In a passionate open letter this morning, a high-level Research in Motion executive offered up some suggestions on how co-CEOs Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis could reshape the company and avoid certain doom. But instead of assuring the executive that things will get better (or even responding to his actual points), all RIM had to offer up in response was a hilariously defensive blog post.

Is Android RIM’s backup plan?

Many are worried about the long-term viability of BlackBerry given its shrinking market share. Of course, Research in Motion is still making money and selling lots of phones. But the competition from iPhone and Android is intense, and it has to do something to be seen as a “next gen” smartphone supplier if it wants to regain its luster.

Crackberry evolved: RIM announces BlackBerry Bold Touch, OS 7

Research in Motion is taking another swipe at integrating touchscreen technology with its iconic keyboards, following the limp release of the BlackBerry Torch last summer. The company today announced the long-awaited BlackBerry Bold Touch, as well as the BlackBerry 7 operating system, at its BlackBerry World conference in Orlando.

What WebOS can teach the iPhone, Android and the rest

HP has been in the news a lot lately touting its vision for a WebOS-filled future. While it’s debatable if we’re in the “post-PC” era, there is no doubt that we are indeed still at the early stages of mobile application development. A quick glance at the mobile platform landscape has my company, the interactive agency POP, learning from our first Windows Phone experiences, continuing to sharpen our skills on iOS…

WSJ's Mossberg rips RIM, Samsung execs a new one

Top mobile device company executives obviously overestimated their ability to positively spin responses to hard-hitting questions from Wall Street Journal tech columnist Walt Mossberg, who moderated a panel discussion about new mobile device trends at the CTIA Wireless 2011 conference today in Orlando.

Apple surges, Android stalls in enterprise activations

Apple’s iOS devices, including iPhones and iPads, are increasingly being bought for use in companies. They now account for 65 percent of all devices activated for enterprise use after discounting activations of Research in Motion’s BlackBerry enterprise phones, according to a report by Good Technology.