facebook like crowd

Facebook steps up Russian programming partnerships

A number of the social network’s top managers have visited Russia to meet local developers since Mark Zuckerberg’s trip to Moscow last year, when the Facebook founder tried to woo Russian programmers to California.

html5 vs native

HTML5 vs. native vs. hybrid mobile apps: 3,500 developers say all three, please

The debate actually precedes the first app store to hit volume.Should you build mobile apps in native code on each platform, or should you build them in cross-platform code, such as HTML5? Increasingly, however, developers are side-stepping that debate and just voting for whatever makes sense in each individual circumstance, according to a survey of 3,500 developers, CIOs, and CTOs. That’s a bit of a change from last year, when 94 percent of developers were betting on HTML5 to win.In fact, 40 percent of developers have started building native, only to switch to HTML5, and 31 percent have started building cross-platform, only to switch to native.“Developers … are quickly realizing that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution for their mobile development process,” Todd Anglin, a EVP at cross-platform development toolmaker Telerik said in a statement. “The choice between native and hybrid approaches is dependent on business needs, app requirements, developer skill, development timeline, and other factors.”[gallery link="file" columns="1" ids="862913,862914,862915,862916,862917,862918,862919,862920,862921"]There is a slight uptick in the number of developers who are going pure HTML5 rather than native, with 41 percent of developers building cross-platform apps rather than native apps, up from 36 percent in January of 2013. And there’s a somewhat significant drop in the number of developers who build pure native, all the time: eight percent, down from 15 percent earlier this year. But most developers continue to use hybrid development methods, with some native apps built with HTML code, some hybrid apps that incorporate native components with shared, cross-platform components, and some apps built in pure cross-platform code.The big question is whether HTML5, which builds app-like interactivity and capability into a web-native format, is enterprise-ready.The answer, according to Telerik’s survey, is that a full third of developers say it is, right now, while a quarter say it will be in the next 12 months. A big chunk of developers, however — 43 percent — say that HTML5 won’t be enterprise-ready before at least a year. And some unbelievers, six percent, say it never will be.That’s a little odd, as 91 percent of respondents said they are already developing with HTML5 — with more projects ongoing on desktop than mobile. And 53 percent said that HTML5 is the way to go multi-platform while also having the benefit of being web-native.Just four percent are developing for iOS only, and just 13 percent are simultaneously developing native apps for all of the web, iOS, and Android.Interestingly, Steve Jobs originally didn’t want native apps on the iPhone, instead preferring web apps. Of course, after the launch of the iOS app store, that all changed, and the tremendous success of Google Play shows a huge amount of interest in native apps in general, not just on iPhone. Today, however, developers are not so religious about native, cross-platform, or hybrid apps, choosing to focus more on what meets the need of each individual project.”When considered in context, we’re seeing plenty of cases where hybrid is the right choice for a given app, and others where native still makes the most sense,” Anglin said. “What developers need, then, are tools that can help them be effective, regardless of the chosen approach.”

Software Developer Stock Image

Software’s eating the world, and devs are serving up the meal

Software engineers who are feeding the beast need tools to deliver the next tasty morsel to ravenous end users. So the question you should be asking yourself is, “How well does my team cook”?

real time app

What is this real-time web you speak of?

Developers have a lot of choices when it comes to real-time data.  It’s smart to investigate your options to find the right fit for your next app.

Why developers are like artists

A few weeks ago my team at MuleSoft created a video describing what it’s like to be a developer at the company, and I noted in the video how developers are like artists. In response, I received numerous questions and comments about it being an interesting metaphor and requests to elaborate on the concept.

Dell's Barton George (left) speaking with a developer at a recent conference

An idiot’s guide to DevOps

“DevOps” is one of those buzzwords that nearly everyone in the tech industry feigns to understand. Few people really do. I’ve always thought it sounds like a codename for some kind of covert NSA mission.

Google plays ice hockey, apparently.

BlackBerry refugees, Google/Motorola is hiring in your hometown

Just days after BlackBerry announced a $1 billion loss, 4,500 layoffs, a buy-out offer, and a canceled earnings call, Google announced that it would be opening a new engineering office in Waterloo for its subsidiary Motorola — about 10 minutes away from BlackBerry’s head office.

mvp-startup-developer-entrepreneur

Evaluating software development is measuring the invisible

We made number of attempts made on elaborate metrics to measure how healthy the teams and clients. No surprise, all story point-based approaches failed miserably, being not able to identify problematic projects.

Adobe

Why I believe in Adobe and the web (op-ed)

Everybody benefits from flourishing open web standards. I am happy Adobe is continuing to embrace that approach, for its contributions to the web and for its Edge tools and services.

iOS 7

The new iOS 7 features you haven't heard about

We used to commission the world’s best artists to paint our chapels and ceremonial halls, we now commission the world’s best digital artists to create software.