Why flash in the cloud will shake up enterprise storage

The big news in storage lately is that EMC is acquiring XtremIO. XtremIO is crafting a next-generation storage array, purpose built for 100% solid-state flash memory. EMC is the market leader in the $30 billion global market for disk-based storage. In acquiring a nascent, unabashedly competitive product to its existing mainstay disk-based storage product line, EMC is foreshadowing the impending flash revolution in data center storage. Flash memory has already transformed consumer devices like smartphones, tablets, and ultra-notebooks (think MacBook Air). These devices use a solid state drive, also know as SSD or flash drive, rather than traditional mechanical disk. Presumably, if you have a flash-based device, you don’t miss those quaint whirring and chirping noises that a PC’s hard drive makes, and flash also delivers radically better performance and battery life. What you may not know is that a similar shift is already underway in the data center: Google’s instant search and Facebook’s performance intensive applications are powered by flash rather than hard drives.

HTML5 versus Adobe Flash (infographic)

One of Steve Jobs’ last major acts before passing was to launch an attack on Adobe Flash. Mobile Apple devices began blocking Flash-powered content, and Apple even went so far as to prevent iOS developers from using Flash — one of the most popular multimedia programming platforms — in their apps. Apple positioned HTML5 not as an alternative, but as a replacement. A few months later that decision was reversed based on “developer feedback” (i.e. Internet outrage), but the battle between HTML5 and Flash rages on.

Howard Marks' Gamzee will focus on social-mobile HTML5 games

Howard Marks has developed pretty good cred in video games. Over the course of 25 years, he helped revive an ailing Activision, which is now the biggest video game publisher. He bought the Acclaim name out of bankruptcy, started working on a number of online games, and sold the company to Playdom in 2010. Now he has turned his focus on a new game start-up, Gamzee.

Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 adds subscriptions and tablet apps

Adobe just revealed the details of Creative Suite 5.5, the software package that includes many of its flagship design and development products, including Photoshop, InDesign, and Flash Builder. Although the number suggests a humdrum release, CS5.5 actually includes some significant changes to how Adobe plans to release and make money from its products.

Adobe: More than 84M smartphones and tablets support AIR

It probably hasn’t been a fun year at Adobe, as the company endured a very public feud with Apple over the absence of its Flash technology on the iPhone and iPad, followed by speculation about its future as an independent company. Nevertheless, Adobe has soldiered on with its strategy to get its technology onto (mostly non-Apple) devices, and now it says those efforts are paying off.