crowdfunding

Crowdfunding: the next generation — four changes that will shake up the model

Crowdfunding has come a long way in a short period of time. What started out as a social experiment several years ago has been validated as a viable means for thousands of people to tap into their inner-entrepreneur. Recent data suggests that crowdfunding – defined here as a contribution toward a project in exchange for non-economic benefits — has enabled more than $1.5 billion to change hands and tens of thousands of projects to get funded, ranging from “passion projects” to real companies.

venture capital is history

Venture capital as we know it is history

New York venture capitalist Fred Wilson recently pointed out that the VC industry is at risk of being marginalized by the emerging crowdfunding industry. I agree that the provision of capital for entrepreneurs is about to change in a big way, but my sense is that the change is not going to hurt VCs.

Entrepreneurs and investors meet in New York to organize for profit and for revolution

There were two pretty incredible tech events in New York this Tuesday. I only managed to score an invite to one of them, the Lerer Ventures CEO summit at Citi Field. The other was Union Square Ventures more exclusive Hacking Society get together, which luckily was live streamed. It’s worth taking a look at these two gatherings to get a sense of where the Silicon Alley scene is at right now and how the most powerful players in the East Coast tech world are thinking about the future.

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Raise Cache: New Yorkers strut for Silicon Alley, raise over $100K for HackNY

On Thursday November 17th, 1,300 plus New York techies descended upon the Lexington Ave Armory to raise over $100,000 for HackNY, a nonprofit organization run out of Columbia and NYU that keeps young engineers off of the “street” (i.e. Wall Street) and in Silicon Alley, the burgeoning New York startup scene.

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Where to hack education and where to stack it

Prominent venture capitalist Fred Wilson wrote a provocative blog post back in 2008 called Hacking Education, in which he expressed frustration with our current educational institutions and called for replacing them with a grand hack, an internet-enabled “peer production, collaboration, social networking, web video, voip, open source, even game play” platform.