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PlayStation reveals cloud strategy at Cloud Gaming USA

Senior leaders from PlayStation Now and Gaikai show how gamers can stream PlayStation’s biggest titles from all devices, making mass cloud streaming possible for PlayStations 4’s large instil base for the first time.

After OnLive: Here’s why Nvidia believes cloud gaming is just getting started (interview)

After cloud gaming leader OnLive ran out of money in August, the future of cloud gaming became, er, cloudy. Rival cloud gaming service Gaikai had sold itself to Sony for $380 million, but OnLive’s failure to gain enough consumers to offset the costs of its cloud infrastructure raised questions about whether cloud technology was economical for games. Cloud gaming let a user play a high-end game on a low-end PC simply by logging into OnLive, which executed games in web-connected data centers that computed the game and sent images to the user’s machine in real time. OnLive launched in 2010, but too few subscribers materialized. Surrounded by free-to-play games, OnLive tried to sell consumers on instant access to the cloud and the capability to log in from any machine.

Will GameStop’s digital ventures be enough to ward off online threats? (interview)

Chris Petrovic (pictured above) is the general manager of GameStop Digital Ventures. His job is to make sure that the world’s largest video game retailer crosses over into the digital era, when gamers are as likely to download a digital game to their computers or phones as they are to walk into a store and buy a disk. GameStop still has 6,614 stores and annual revenues of $49.5 billion. Within a couple of years, the company wants to grow its digital revenues to $1.5 billion a year. The retailer grew its downloadable content sales by 315 percent last year, and it has acquired digital game startups Kongregate, Spawn Labs, and Impulse. Will that be enough for the company to “cross over” to the digital age?

Sony buys Gaikai game streaming service for $380M

Sony announced tonight that it will acquire the streaming video-game service Gaikai for $380 million. The deal officially closed on June 30, and Sony is purchasing the California-based company as part of a move to disrupt the gaming business.

The DeanBeat: Will your game company survive the zombie apocalypse?

The Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) video game trade show in Los Angeles was full of glitzy press conferences (like Ubisoft’s, pictured above). So many big companies were acting like it was business as usual. They showed games that were the third or fourth in the series on the same generation of game consoles. One very well-known game developer came up to me and said, “I wonder if any of this is going to matter. There is so much change happening in the industry that is going to make this all irrelevant.”