startups innovate on gene sequencing

Genome entrepreneurs say their data will help you live longer

The cost of sequencing the human genome continues to fall, reaching a low of $1,000 this year due to a new microchip and machine designed by genetics company Life Technologies Corp. And unleashed by those lower costs, a small cadre of entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley is exploring ways to harness this data to enable us to live longer and healthier lives.

Roundup: Genetic links to breast cancer, Avandia under attack, death and the drug official, and more

More genetic links for breast cancer — Whole-genome association studies that tease out links between minute genetic variations and the likelihood of disease are definitely building momentum. Over the last several days, researchers reported six new variations that increase the risk of breast cancer for women who have inherited them. (For background, see this Boston Globe piece or my recent take on the subject.) It’s now conceivable that scientists may soon have an excellent handle on the genetic contributions to this particular disease.

Needles emerge from the genomic haystack

Scientists yesterday reported finding seven new gene variants linked to diabetes, a sign that the disease-gene hunt may have finally attained a sort of critical momentum.