Uber

German court lifts nationwide Uber ban

Today the Frankfurt regional court in Germany reversed a temporary injunction against Uber, permitting the car service startup to once again operate its UberPop ridesharing service in the region.

A HelloFresh box.

With $50M banked, HelloFresh CEO plans 'global consumer food brand' (interview)

HelloFresh delivers a food box that lets subscribers make high-quality self-cooked meals at home. Customers can pick between different recipes and receive the exact number and portion of the ingredients needed. That way they get the right ingredients and are not stuck with leftovers. HelloFresh claims to deliver well over one million meals per month.

uber_606

Uber revs up its German expansion

The limousine service will soon be launching in multiple German cities. Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, and Hamburg are up next. At the moment, Uber is only available in Munich and Berlin.

Facebook local currency

Meet Venturate, German AngelList alternative

Venturate performs a preselection screening process before passing startups on to VCs – helpful, as VCs are often inundated with irrelevant business plans and pitches.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel

German chancellor to Obama: Stop listening in on my cell phone

The German leader called President Obama demanding clarification and said that if such practices were being employed, it “would be a serious breach of trust” and “completely unacceptable”.

This is German for "No trespassing!"

Deutsche Telekom’s plan to thwart foreign spies: 'No single byte leaves Germany'

Deutsche Telekom has announced a new plan to protect German internet traffic from international spying efforts post-NSA revelations.In August, Deutsche Telekom launched “Email Made in Germany“, an encrypted email service that only uses German servers to process and store all local email traffic. Now, the company wants to go a step further by working with other internet providers to introduce a so-called “National Routing” service. The service would ensure all emails and data packages sent locally do not leave German borders — at the moment, traffic is often rerouted via internet hubs in the UK or the US — WirtschaftsWoche reported on Saturday.Thomas Kremer, a board member of Telekom’s data privacy, legal affairs and compliance, told the magazine that “while being transported from the sender to the receiver in Germany, we want to guarantee that no single byte leaves Germany.”The plan is still being finalized. In order for Deutsche Telekom to achieve it, it’ll have to get the agreement of all its competitors, including Telefónica and Vodafone. WiWo reported that Deutsche Telekom’s next move could see the solution spread to cover the Schengen region of Europe.Germans were deeply concerned after documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden showed that Germany was as large a target for surveillance as Iraq and China, with half a billion phone calls, texts and emails investigated every month. Telekom’s solution does not, however, offer a way to prevent German secret service BND from accessing the communications – BND has already confirmed it has provided surveillance data for the NSA.

Germany

German accelerator's latest batch takes aim at health, personal data, and education

Deutsche Telekom-backed Hubraum today kicked off the next round of its accelerator program in Berlin and revealed the seven startups taking part. The latest batch of teams includes health technology startups, an online education startup, a digital identity provider and a service that lets users monetize their own personal data.