Did Facebook mistime its IPO? Profit and revenue fall on seasonal ad slide

Facebook is king of the social networks, but when it comes to its business model, it looks a lot like a traditional media company. 15 percent of its revenue comes from games like Zynga, but the rest is advertising, purchased in large part by the same blue chip brands who shop at Conde Nast or the New York Times.

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Facebook picks Nasdaq for IPO

In preparation for its upcoming IPO, Facebook has chosen to list its shares on the Nasdaq stock exchange under the symbol “FB,” according to the New York Times.

Buying IPO stock? Might as well forget about rich returns

The past two years have seen a marked rebound in the number of venture-backed technology companies that are going public. After the depths of the “great recession” in 2009, it’s quite a relief for venture capitalists and those who invest in their funds.

Beware the king: Zuckerberg’s voting power a risk to shareholders

As VentureBeat’s Jolie O’Dell pointed out yesterday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg managed to strike a deal with some key investors and friends that gives him 57 percent of the shareholder voting power. For a public company, it’s an almost unheard of concentration of authority, a troubling sign for those who focus on shareholder rights.

How “The Hacker Way” helped propel Facebook to market dominance

Facebook’s core values include a powerful, results-oriented, anti-theoretical philosophy called “The Hacker Way,” according to founder Mark Zuckerberg.
“The Hacker Way is an approach to building that involves continuous improvement and iteration,” Zuckerberg writes. “Hackers believe that something can always be better, and that nothing is ever complete. They just have to go fix it — often in the face of people who say it’s impossible or are content with the status quo.”