Amazon unveils Kindle Fire HD, Kindle Paperwhite e-reader

Amazon today lifted the veil on the newest additions to its lineup of tablet devices and e-readers. Clearly, in an attempt to convince consumers ahead of the holiday shopping season that its hardware can be both cheap and sexy.

apps

Amazon’s app store sees massive growth (but it’s no Google Play)

Amazon’s app store for Android has grown massively in popularity since the Kindle Fire was released in November 2011, doubling the number of developers who publish to the store and tripling the number of apps. Plus, Amazon says, hundreds of millions of apps have now been downloaded from the store.
Of course, that’s barely a blip on the Google’s radar, since the official Android market, Google Play, has seen more than 20 billion downloads on 600,000 apps.

Google’s Nexus 7: Finally, an Android tablet worth owning (review)

The Nexus 7 isn’t a revolutionary tablet, but it’s certainly an evolutionary one: a device that builds on the mistakes and successes of Android tablets thus far. It’s the first to crawl out of the ocean of terrible Android slates, and on the way it’s crushed the slower and weaker Kindle Fire (which was oh-so-close). Call it natural tablet selection.

GamesBeat Weekly Roundup

If you follow VentureBeat but don’t regularly check our GamesBeat site, here’s a list of the best games stories we ran over the last seven days that you may have missed.

How Amazon can be a friend to small businesses

I’ve been testing out the Kindle Fire tablet for the last several weeks. At $199, it’s a tremendous value. It’s no iPad — I just upgraded to the new iPad as well — but it provides a solid base-level tablet and reader. I can think of a lot of uses for it: an e-book reader, a video consumption device, and a dedicated Sonos controller. But the most exciting use I can see for it would be for Amazon to turn into a device that helps small, local retailers.