html5 vs native

HTML5 vs. native vs. hybrid mobile apps: 3,500 developers say all three, please

The debate actually precedes the first app store to hit volume.Should you build mobile apps in native code on each platform, or should you build them in cross-platform code, such as HTML5? Increasingly, however, developers are side-stepping that debate and just voting for whatever makes sense in each individual circumstance, according to a survey of 3,500 developers, CIOs, and CTOs. That’s a bit of a change from last year, when 94 percent of developers were betting on HTML5 to win.In fact, 40 percent of developers have started building native, only to switch to HTML5, and 31 percent have started building cross-platform, only to switch to native.“Developers … are quickly realizing that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution for their mobile development process,” Todd Anglin, a EVP at cross-platform development toolmaker Telerik said in a statement. “The choice between native and hybrid approaches is dependent on business needs, app requirements, developer skill, development timeline, and other factors.”[gallery link="file" columns="1" ids="862913,862914,862915,862916,862917,862918,862919,862920,862921"]There is a slight uptick in the number of developers who are going pure HTML5 rather than native, with 41 percent of developers building cross-platform apps rather than native apps, up from 36 percent in January of 2013. And there’s a somewhat significant drop in the number of developers who build pure native, all the time: eight percent, down from 15 percent earlier this year. But most developers continue to use hybrid development methods, with some native apps built with HTML code, some hybrid apps that incorporate native components with shared, cross-platform components, and some apps built in pure cross-platform code.The big question is whether HTML5, which builds app-like interactivity and capability into a web-native format, is enterprise-ready.The answer, according to Telerik’s survey, is that a full third of developers say it is, right now, while a quarter say it will be in the next 12 months. A big chunk of developers, however — 43 percent — say that HTML5 won’t be enterprise-ready before at least a year. And some unbelievers, six percent, say it never will be.That’s a little odd, as 91 percent of respondents said they are already developing with HTML5 — with more projects ongoing on desktop than mobile. And 53 percent said that HTML5 is the way to go multi-platform while also having the benefit of being web-native.Just four percent are developing for iOS only, and just 13 percent are simultaneously developing native apps for all of the web, iOS, and Android.Interestingly, Steve Jobs originally didn’t want native apps on the iPhone, instead preferring web apps. Of course, after the launch of the iOS app store, that all changed, and the tremendous success of Google Play shows a huge amount of interest in native apps in general, not just on iPhone. Today, however, developers are not so religious about native, cross-platform, or hybrid apps, choosing to focus more on what meets the need of each individual project.”When considered in context, we’re seeing plenty of cases where hybrid is the right choice for a given app, and others where native still makes the most sense,” Anglin said. “What developers need, then, are tools that can help them be effective, regardless of the chosen approach.”

Why LinkedIn dumped HTML5 & went native for its mobile apps

“There are a few things that are critically missing. One is tooling support. The second is operability. Because those two things don’t exist, people are falling back to native. It’s not that HTML5 isn’t ready; it’s that the ecosystem doesn’t support it.”

Lotte hybrid app

Hybrid mobile apps take off as HTML5 vs. native debate continues

Everyone seems to be gung-ho about HTML5 or native mobile apps, and religiously preaching for one approach over the other. Yet, while mobile giants such as Apple and Google battle it out, some companies are already opting for a third option — mediating the two approaches in what is popularly known as the “hybrid app approach”.

App downloads will hit 44 billion in 2016

The success of downloadable smartphone apps will continue at least through the next five years. A new study from ABI Research estimates that app industry will achieve 44 billion cumulative downloads by 2016.

How the mobile web will win

Editor’s note: This discussion about the superphone app platform is one of the five themes we will be focusing on at the VentureBeat Mobile Summit, on April 25-26. We’ve carefully invited the top executives in mobile to discuss the biggest challenges of the day, which, if solved, can lead to much faster growth in the industry. And at our discussion about HTML5 versus native, we’ll have top executives around the table, including Facebook, Google, Verizon, Sencha, AT&T and more.

How HTML5 will kill the native app

Over the past two decades, the mobile industry has become increasingly stunted by fragmented protocols, standards, and regional differences. But a hot new technology called HTML5 promises to remedy this by delivering an unprecedented open, democratic and wonderfully fertile mobile web.

Facebook CTO: 2011 is all about mobile and HTML5

Facebook may be the most-downloaded free application on the iPhone, but today the company’s chief technology officer Bret Taylor seemed more excited about the opportunities offered by the mobile Web and HTML5.