Mind the facts: Quick tips to stay vigilant while reading news

It’s easy to become caught up in tweets or Facebook posts alleging a story is true when there is very little to back it up. Recent events like the Boston Marathon bombing and fertilizer plant explosion in Texas incite a swarm of incorrect information including photos, videos, and stories. It’s important as a consumer of news to be able to determine what’s fake and what actually happened.

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Twitter on NBCgate: we screwed up (partially)

Twitter has taken the extraordinary step of kinda sorta partially apologizing on its blog for taking down UK journalist Guy Adams’ Twitter account. Even more significantly, the company’s top lawyer wrote the blog post — not the communications staff.

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Twitter: you crossed the line

Yesterday Twitter suspended UK journalist Guy Adam’s account for tweeting negatively about NBC’s coverage of the Olympics, including tweeting an email address of the NBC executive in charge. Today we’ve learned that it was not NBC that initiated a complaint, but Twitter, which took the surprising step of proactively informing NBC.

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A post about NBC’s Olympics coverage that NBC might agree with

NBC has been getting a lot of flak on social networks lately for its handling of the Olympics. Because of the time difference between the United States and London, most of the high-profile events are shown with a delay of several hours.

NBC and Facebook team for cross-network social media coverage of the Olympics

Recognizing that Facebook has become the people’s broadcast network, NBC Olympics, the official broadcast partner of the IOC, has today partnered with Facebook to provide consumers with London 2012 Olympics news and other coverage on Facebook, create social media segments for television viewers, and incorporate Facebook intelligence into its coverage of the Games.

Aereo says people have a legal right to rabbit ears and DVRs, countersues the big TV networks

Aereo, the New York startup that is building a new system for streaming and recoding live TV, is countersuing the big TV networks that filed a lawsuit against it at the beginning of this month. The company, which is backed by local investors like First Round Capital and Barry Diller’s IAC, says that the courts have already ruled in favor of their technology, just not in this innovative new form.

Streaming service Aereo ready for legal war with TV networks

Incumbent industries have a history of challenging new technologies that disrupt the established way they do business. For example, AT&T sued to keep everything from the answering machine to the Hush-A-Phone out of the market. Yesterday’s news that all the major TV networks are filing suit against streaming TV service Aereo is the latest in a long line of battles about how technology evolves. And Aereo, which recently raised $25 million from backers that include billionaire Barry Diller’s IAC, is ready for a war.