Samsung: Galaxy Nexus ban based on ‘insufficient evidence’

South Korea’s Samsung Sunday appealed Friday’s preliminary injunction against sales of the Android-based Galaxy Nexus. In papers filed with the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, Samsung lawyers argue that the judge had “legally insufficient evidence” that Apple would be irreparably harmed.

Motorola Mobility and Microsoft in patent licensing cat fight

Usually, patent disputes are courtly affairs, decided before a judge and making most readers nod off and turn to the latest Lindsay Lohan news. Thank goodness for companies such as Motorola Mobility and Microsoft, who are having a very public cat-fight over patent royalties. You can hear the Silicon Valley hissing all the way from the East Coast.

patent-troll

Who’s a patent troll now? Oracle joins Google and Apple in Lodsys patent fights

This one goes in the I’m-not-sure-what-to think category. Oracle, the company that just failed in its attempt to sue Google for violating dubious-sounding patents relating to Java technologies acquired in the Sun takeover, is now suing Lodsys, which has somewhat successfully sued app developers and website owners for violating its own dubious-sounding patents.

Fitness gadget maker Basis to BodyMedia: Your lawsuit claims are invalid

It’s fitness gadget maker against fitness gadget maker. In February 2012, BodyMedia, maker of the FIT armbands that promote weight loss and health, filed a patent infringement civil action against competing fitness gadget maker Basis. On Monday of this week, three months after the suit was filed in court, BodyMedia served the lawsuit to Basis. Thursday, Basis countered back, telling BodyMedia that its lawsuit claims are invalid.

Patent wars

How expanding Twitter’s pledge could end the patent wars

Twitter’s momentous announcement yesterday that it would only use its patent portfolio defensively was received with wide acclaim by the tech world. With two small changes, Twitter’s Innovator’s Patent Agreement (IPA) could actually completely change the landscape of software patents.

AOL sells most of its patents to Microsoft for $1B, goosing its stock price 43%

Update 2 p.m. Pacific: AOL stock closed up 43 percent for the day. News hit the wires this morning that AOL plans to sell 800 of its 1,100 patents to Microsoft for $1 billion in cash, money CEO Tim Armstrong says will be used to repay AOL shareholders. This one-time transaction also grants Microsoft a non-exclusive license to to the 300 remaining patents, which cover key technologies such as advertising, search, content generation/management, social networking, mapping, multimedia/streaming, and security.