How to get a top 10 website to pay attention to your startup

This is part two of a five part series sponsored by Under the Radar aimed at helping innovative startups attract the attention of C-level executives. (Previously: Biren Gandhi of Cisco.) Meet Peter and hear how he manages technology at Under the Radar 2013, May 22-23, in San Francisco. Register today: www.utrconf.com.

Three ways Android is kicking the iPhone 5 to the curb

While I’d still recommend an iPhone for my mom, the new breed of Android devices with 5-inch screens exceed the iPhone 5 in every aspect, including hardware, operating system, and apps.

Zynga is vastly undervalued

How can a company that brings in $1.2 billion a year, and recently cut costs in order to achieve profitability, have a market value that’s effectively zero? It doesn’t make sense. Here’s why Zynga is undervalued — provided it does the right thing next.

Responsive design

The case for responsive design

Peter Yared, CTO of CBS Interactive, stirred up a bit of controversy recently when he wrote that adaptive design techniques make it difficult for publishers to monetize content.

Has adaptive design failed? Of course not

Yesterday morning I read Peter Yared’s provocative article, ‘What’s next for mobile now that adaptive design has failed?’ which is based entirely on the misassumption that mobile users don’t scroll. If that were true, the reasoning might be valid, but it’s not. It’s utter nonsense.

Pressly

What’s next for mobile now that adaptive design has failed?

[Update: This article was written for business readers. Due to an outcry from the responsive design community after this was published, I added the word “web” to the term “adaptive design” to avoid confusion with progressive enhancement, and updated the text to read that Facebook uses “a precursor to” responsive design, even though very techie trades like RWW say that Facebook uses responsive design. Obviously, the outcry has more to do with the content than the terminology, but it’s always good to be pedantic. Read on!]

Patent wars

How expanding Twitter’s pledge could end the patent wars

Twitter’s momentous announcement yesterday that it would only use its patent portfolio defensively was received with wide acclaim by the tech world. With two small changes, Twitter’s Innovator’s Patent Agreement (IPA) could actually completely change the landscape of software patents.

How RIM could save itself: With a “super feature phone”

Research In Motion is reportedly attempting to sell itself after rejecting the former co-CEO’s plan to open up its network to carriers. But for some reason it is not pursuing the creation of a lucrative category between smart phones and feature phones — the super feature phone.

Flurry graph

2012: The year of the App-ocalypse?

In the past week, two high-profile mobile apps were effectively shut down and acquired — Hipster by Aol and Oink by Google. Both had big PR buildups, rave reviews from the tech press, and strong usage from the digerati.

HTML5 vs. native apps: How to pick the right path

The mobile technology landscape is incredibly confusing. There are numerous choices, ranging from new HTML5 technologies, native app development methods, and all sorts of content management systems. At CBS Interactive, we have numerous mobile solutions, including native apps for CBS.com, CNET, and “60 Minutes,” along with mobile-optimized Web sites for GameFaqs and global properties like ZDnet. At first blush, it seems problematic…

Facebook is about to feature-creep itself into a usage U-turn

People use Facebook a lot. They use it to share photos. They use it to invite people to events. They use it as an address book and messaging system. They use it as a games platform. The growth has been so staggering that Facebook is by far the most popular website and can’t even fill its existing ad display inventory.

Why HP needs to merge with SAP

HP has had to face tough realities this week. Fortunately, there is a way for it to survive: Embrace the inevitable trend favoring “vertical” companies.

Big Three

Good morning, would you like an Apple, Google or Microsoft?

While it comes as a big surprise that Google is buying Motorola Mobility, it is just as surprising that Apple launched a cloud service that will eventually fully compete with Google’s services and Microsoft essentially turned Nokia into its own private Foxconn and will compete with Apple’s devices.

Why Time Warner should reacquire Aol

Aol released its earnings today a week after Time Warner, its former dot-com merger partner, announced earnings. The two businesses, once considered completely disparate and deemed one of the worst corporate mergers of all time, are now increasingly complementary as the industry shifts beyond delivery mechanism to content as the value differentiator.

Just like Google and Facebook, Twitter now charges brands to reach their own customers

You know a web service has reached massive scale when it can charge brands to reach their own customers. Google has been doing it for years, Facebook’s been at it for the past couple of years, and now Twitter has just entered this hallowed territory with its new promoted tweets feature, which lets brands keep their tweets alive in your stream only if you have already followed that brand. The irony here is that you are only seeing these promoted tweets if you already followed that brand – so the brand is paying to advertise to users that already like it.

How the carriers screwed themselves out of mobile payments

There has been a huge scrum amongst the smartphone players to capture the market for phone-based purchases. In a very surprising move, the major US-based carriers just folded their mobile payments hand, and folded it hard. Isis, the mobile payment system sponsored by Verizon, AT&T and TMobile, announced that it had signed deals with Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover to its touch and go payment systems.