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How LinkedIn's Reid Hoffman taught Stanford students to build billion-dollar businesses through personal networks (in 4 quotes)

The founder of LinkedIn visited Stanford University’s super-popular tech startup class and dispensed some advice on how to lead a business to Internet fame. The course is curated by noted investor Sam Altman, who has opened up his Rolodex of tech celebrities and asked them to teach the next generation of eager startup founders about how to make it in Silicon Valley.

Reid Hoffman and Steve Ballmer in bowler hats

Steve Ballmer makes case for total Windows domination

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer sketched his view of technology’s future in an onstage discussion with LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman tonight in a wide-ranging discussion that covered everything from Surface to Windows Phone to Xbox to cloud services.

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Online photo editor Aviary hopes to take Picnik’s place

Sad that Google’s online photo editor Picnik is meeting its demise this year? Well, veteran photo editing service Aviary is plotting to take its place. On Monday the company announced it’s bringing its photo editing services to the Web with a new Facebook app.

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Reid Hoffman discusses surviving the pivot

There’s a point in the lives of most startups where a radical shift has to occur in order for them to hit the next level. If done right, it can be transformative – but too many startup owners cling to their original ideas and drag their companies down in the process.

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Reid Hoffman’s entrepreneurial rules of thumb

As the co-founder of popular business social network LinkedIn, Reid Hoffman knows a thing or two about successfully launching a startup. In this Entrepreneur Thought Leader Lecture given at Stanford University, he details the rules he has historically used when creating a venture: Look for disruptive change, aim high, build a network around your company, plan for good and bad luck and maintain flexible persistence. Most importantly, he says, remember these rules are just rules of thumb by which you navigate – they’re not carved in stone.