Happy birthday, Curiosity

On August 5, 2012, we watched the lil’ guy make its way to the surface of the red planet. Since then, Curiosity has drilled into Martian rock with lasers, scooped up soil samples, found evidence of water, and set up an adorable Twitter account.

Take our huge photo-tour of the all-new Exploratorium in San Francisco

#gallery-713007-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-713007-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-713007-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-713007-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Your eyes can play a lot of tricks on you, as this section of the museum proves. The Exploratorium will open officially on April 17. Workers are still putting the finishing touches on many indoor and outdoor exhibits. The Exploratorium’s exhibits include a few water-based feats of art and science, such as a 150-foot bridge for visitors to study fog. A tiny outdoor exhibit commemorating everyone’s favorite irrational number. This mobile camera obscura turns the world on its head — literally. In the social science section, newer forms of media play an interesting role in exhibits like this one. The Exploratorium is less about wandering through static displays and more about getting your hands dirty — with science! This giant clockwork mechanism expands and lights up every hour on the hour to display a floating, illuminated clock face that kinda reminds us of Disneyland’s It’s A Small World exterior. The kind of museum exhibit you’re used to: Fun, hands-on exploration. Makers need verbs. The hands-on Tinkering Studio encourages visitors to get hands-on with the building blocks of invention. A tour guide shows off a giant sculpture of toothpicks at The Exploratorium. A space for makers and tinkerers in The Exploratorium. Three lights cast three shadows in different colors in the optics section of the museum. A botanist works behind glass to maintain and grow plants as visitors pass by the plant exhibits nearby. Seedlings grow in The Exploratorium’s back-of-house area. An exhibit on natural decomposition. Plants growing in the Exploratorium’s back-of-house area. The hidden parts of a science museum’s inner workings are exposed at the Exploratorium, allowing visitors to see how exhibits are maintained. As steam wafts out, mushrooms grow inside. The smoke you see is mist. Plants grow amid other, smaller flora in this exhibit A powerful fan whips a miniature sea into a frenzy. The Confused Sea exhibit on weather and water. The dissection bar lets visitors delve into plant anatomy in a hands-on way. Water-resistant leaves in the plant section. A huge tree trunk commands an exhibit on plant life. “Life Among the Logs” exhibit on plant life Exhibits in San Francisco science museum The Exploratorium. Exhibits in San Francisco science museum The Exploratorium. The campus’s buildings extend over San Francisco Bay and even feature a seismic joint to allow the water-straddling property to ebb and flow up to 18 inches. The museum’s indoor/outdoor space sit on “San Francisco’s front porch,” said the museum’s executive director. More than a dozen sensors on the pier show water, air, and weather conditions displayed in real time. Check it out: We got a sneak peek at the Exploratorium’s new digs!

Here’s a sneak peek from inside the revamped Exploratorium in San Francisco

#gallery-713184-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-713184-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-713184-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-713184-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Your eyes can play a lot of tricks on you, as this section of the museum proves. The hands-on Tinkering Studio encourages visitors to get hands-on with the building blocks of invention. A botanist works behind glass to maintain and grow plants as visitors pass by the plant exhibits nearby. The hidden parts of a science museum’s inner workings are exposed at the Exploratorium, allowing visitors to see how exhibits are maintained. The museum’s indoor/outdoor space sit on “San Francisco’s front porch,” said the museum’s executive director. A space for makers and tinkerers in The Exploratorium. The campus’s buildings extend over San Francisco Bay and even feature a seismic joint to allow the water-straddling property to ebb and flow up to 18 inches. This mobile camera obscura turns the world on its head — literally. The Exploratorium will open officially on April 17. Workers are still putting the finishing touches on many indoor and outdoor exhibits. Here’s our first look inside (and outside) San Francisco’s 44-year-old science museum, The Exploratorium.