Brooklyn’s Spotflux raises $1M to help users regain their privacy on the web

Concerns over privacy on the web seems to be reaching a boiling point, with federal agencies and legislators looking into the policies and practices of Facebook, Apple and Google. Today the Brooklyn based startup Spotflux is announcing a $1 million funding led by New Atlantic Ventures and taking the beta label off its product in time for SXSW. And if you had any doubt about what a hot button issue privacy has become, Spotflux is currently leading the voting in the SXSW people’s choice awards.

Lookout releases app that shows mobile threats as they happen

The app, called Mobile Threat Tracker, opens up to a view of the earth, shadowed like nighttime. A glow across the globe suggests Lookout Mobile users. It shows attacks in real time as Lookout Mobile’s security application detects and deflects them. This is then translated into what seems like a shooting star. You can travel around the globe by swiping your finger side to side to see attacks in progress. You can also look at analysis for the week on the top three threats and see what kind of threats those were. For instance, this week mobile users saw 60 percent more malware attacks than spyware attacks, including the attacks RuPaidMarket, Legacy, and DepositMobi.

Security champ Symantec makes a play for the cloud with $115M purchase of LiveOffice

LiveOffice primarily helps companies archiving e-mail in the cloud, ensuring that they always have access to important communications. If a company’s e-mail client goes down, for example, its employees can still send and receive messages. The company’s archiving, hosting and compliance solutions will bolster Symantec’s popular security products like Norton AntiVirus and give it more clout as a cloud service provider.

Blizzard makes $26M on World of Warcraft security authenticators [update]

Update: As pointed out below in the reader comments, these estimates are likely off by a sizable amount as they do not take into account the free Battle.net Mobile Authenticator. Users of the free app are entitled to the Core Hound Pup in-game pet (which was used to come up with the $26 million figure) just as users of the paid authenticator are, so it’s virtually impossible to calculate how much revenue has actually been made via this product. Sincere apologies for the misinformation.