Healthcare 2.0 — is it only for the rich?

Twenty years ago, U.S. healthcare cost $2,800, on average, per person. Ten years ago, that figure had risen to $4,700 per person. And four years ago, in 2008, it was $7,500 per person, according to this Kaiser Family Foundation Report. Over the same period, the portion of Americans without insurance has risen. In 1990, 14.1 percent of Americans were uninsured. In 2000, 13.1 percent were uninsured. Today, 16.3% of Americans are uninsured (approximately 50 million people), in part because of job losses and employers cutting back on coverage.

Why this decade will be the most innovative in history

Many people believe that we’ve run out of ideas and that the future will be one of bleak shortages of food, energy, and water. Billionaire Peter Thiel, for example, argues that, despite spectacular advances in computer-related fields, technological progress has actually stalled because the internal combustion engine still rules our highways, the cancer death rate has barely changed since 1971, and the top speed at which people can travel has ceased to improve.

Ray Kurzweil on how entrepreneurs can live forever (video)

Futurist Ray Kurzweil believes that health and medicine are going to benefit in the next two decades from what he calls the law of accelerating returns. That idea comes from Kurzweil’s 2005 book “The Singularity is Near,” and it reflects his optimism about how “exponential technologies” will come together to deliver a world where we can solve all of our problems. We’ve got an exclusive video interview on what Kurzweil thinks about those ideas now and how he is recruiting entrepreneurs to make his vision happen.