Is the social marketing revolution finally running out of hot air?

Maybe it’s time to ask whether we even want to be marketed to on social media. Facebook is the new interactive site, and Twitter is as effective as an email newsletter. If this is a revolution, I’m going to what else is on TV.

Funding daily: Let someone else run your social media marketing

Hope it’s summery and warm where you are, funding news readers. The weather in San Francisco is lovely, if you ignore the dark wall of fog creeping slowly towards the VentureBeat office. The outlook is definitely sunny for these companies! Check out who got funded today, and don’t forget to click the links in each paragraph for more details.

rokusuperheroTN

Extole turns regular customers into brand ambassadors, raises $10M

Nearly every company has a social presence these days, but personal recommendations are often a more powerful way to boost sales. If you’ve never heard about a company before, but your friend has, you’ll likely trust her opinion over that of a complete stranger. But keeping track of how much customer referrals really help your business can be hard, so Extole has created a way to track word-of-mouth marketing.

Offerpop launches community marketing apps for Twitter and Facebook

Offerpop, a software development company for social media applications, has launched a new marketing app that lets retailers and brands bolster their Twitter and Facebook profiles for maximum impact. Only the Twitter application is currently available to the public, but the company is accepting beta testers for its Facebook version.

Disaboom offers social networking for those with disabilities — if it can attract them

Social marketing is generally a matter of attracting like-minded people and aiming advertising at them. Getting at disparate and often amorphous groups who nevertheless still have something in common is quite a bit trickier, though — which explains the genesis of Disaboom.com, a new social-networking/marketing site aimed at bringing together people with disabilities, a group every bit as diverse as the general U.S. population.