Take-Two’s Karl Slatoff won’t rush blockbuster video games out the door

Karl Slatoff is the executive vice president and chief operating officer at Take-Two Interactive, which has published some of the hottest-selling video games in history, from Grand Theft Auto IV to Red Dead Redemption and this year’s LA Noire. Not everything New York-based Take-Two does is golden (Duke Nukem Forever is getting bad reviews), but Take-Two is definitely carving out a reputation as a haven for some of the video game industry’s most-talented developers.

VentureBeat’s photo gallery captures the noise of E3 2011 (part 1)

The only thing bad about an E3 photo gallery is that you can’t hear the sounds. E3, the video game industry’s trade show, is an extremely loud trade show, with game exhibitors blasting sounds as much as they can to draw attention to their games. The convention drew an estimated 45,000 people to Los Angeles this week. We were there from the first parties to the last. We saw many of the 35,000 screens showing off new games. Here’s the show in pictures.

Kabam raises $85M for hardcore social gaming business

Here’s a “kaboom” for all those social game skeptics out there. Kabam has raised $85 million in a fourth round of funding to fuel its business making hardcore games for social networks such as Facebook. The backers include Google Ventures, Pinnacle Ventures, Performance Equity and SK Telecom Ventures, as well as earlier backers.

Will Wright says games are headed toward ubiquity, diversity, and art

Will Wright is perhaps the most successful video game designer in history, creating games from SimCity to Spore. His games have sold tens of millions of units and have opened up new genres such as life simulations and “god” games. So there’s nobody better to talk about the future of video games. At a recent talk, Wright predicted games will become ubiquitous and more diverse, and some will be meaningful works of art.

Calling all gamers! U.S. video games sales dip 5 percent in January

Video game players may have been too busy playing with their Christmas toys last month, as U.S. sales of video games fell 5 percent in January. Total sales of game hardware, PC games, console games, and portables fell to $1.16 billion from $1.22 billion a year ago, according to market researcher NPD. And January a year ago was down from the year before that.

Atari game creator Al Alcorn talks about creating Pong and modern game industry

Allan Alcorn is a one of the wizards of Atari and one of the fathers of the video game industry. Back in the early 1970s, he got together with Nolan Bushnell to create coin-operated video games, such as an arcade version of the early game Spacewar! Bushnell asked Alcorn to make a simple ping pong game, a version of the Magnavox Odyssey’s tennis game, under a contract from General Electric.

From Kinect to Angry Birds — the biggest video game stories of 2010

During 2010, we wrote about 1,100 stories on the video game industry — and the year isn’t over yet. But here’s a look back at what we thought were the biggest stories of the year. For fun, here’s a link to our story from a year ago, when we deemed that the biggest story of 2009 was that the industry discovered that video games weren’t recession proof.

The sights of Blizzcon 2010, day two

It took Blizzcon 2010 attendees a little longer to fill up the Anaheim convention center today, but by the end of the night the place was once again packed with fans of Blizzard Entertainment’s video games. Tenacious D, a musical group featuring actor and musician Jack Black, closed out the conference by rocking out to some World of Warcraft-themed videos.

Insomniac Games’ Ted Price on keeping the workplace fun

You’d expect the video game industry to be one that’s pretty fun to work in. But the hours can be brutal, and a lot of people who enter the field burn out quickly. Ted Price, President and CEO of Insomniac Games (makers of the “Ratchet and Clank” and “Resistance” franchises) talks in this Perfect Business video segment about how his company keeps things light and promotes collaboration among its employees. The methods include a lack of bureaucracy, office happy hours and even cruises.