human intelligence smartphone

Our iPhones will soon be more intelligent than we are

Within 14 years, the smartphones in our pockets will be as intelligent as we are. In fact, if we focus just on computational intelligence (leaving aside emotional and other forms of intelligence), our phones will match us in just seven years — about when the iPhone 11 is likely to be released.

immigration

Sensible immigration reform may finally have a chance in Washington

Congress’ inability to move forward on immigration reform has taken a toll on the country’s global competitiveness. Chinese companies such as Alibaba and Xiaomi now have their eyes on U.S. markets. But there may finally be hope to slow the skilled immigrant exodus that has been crippling U.S. innovation.

Vivek Wadhwa is a fellow at Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University.

Why India shouldn’t be succeeding — but is about to experience an innovation boom

When I started researching India’s engineering education in 2005, my first conclusion was that Indian I.T. was doomed. The country was barely graduating enough engineers to staff this growing industry. The quality of engineers that India’s universities graduated was also inconsistent, and most were unemployable.

Bizarro world, and how women are helping each other

Vivek Wadhwa is vice president of innovation and research at Singularity University and Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University. 

The right of the people to keep and fly drones

As the use of unmanned aerial vehicles by governments increases — even by state and city governments — what does the future hold? Do individuals have a right to fly their own drones, too?

What companies must do to survive the decade

Companies all over the world are becoming increasingly worried about their ability to innovate and compete in the fast-changing technology world. That’s according to GE’s third annual “Global Innovation Barometer” released Jan 17.

Five innovations that will define tech in 2013

Tablets, the quantified self movement, big data, new user interface paradigms, and the return of manufacturing jobs to the U.S. will help shape the coming year.

workforce

Ray Kurzweil on the future workforce

One of the most worrisome aspects of rapid advances in technology is its impact on jobs.

How the Aakash tablet bounced back

In its second incarnation, India’s $35 Aaakash tablet has finally achieved the potential to revolutionize education for millions.

America: Why are you so afraid of skilled immigrants?

One of the most contentious issues in the skilled-immigrant debate is the H-1B visa, which allows qualified immigrants to work for U.S. tech companies on a temporary basis. Proponents of raising the H-1B visa cap say the nation faces a dire shortage of engineering talent and needs more of these visas to stay competitive. Detractors insist that there is no engineer shortage and that America should close its doors to foreigners because they take jobs away from citizens. Battles break out in Capitol Hill over the number of visas allocated because there are no hard data to back either side.

Silicon Valley needs to rethink its fascination with IPOs

When it comes to the IPO, both the Valley’s entrepreneurs and our government leaders are misguided. The IPO isn’t a profit superhighway, with on-ramps and exits for entrepreneurs thirsty for a quick profit. Rather, an IPO is like a marriage.

Why you shouldn’t listen to Peter Thiel about dropping out of college

Attention high school graduates with dreams of becoming a doctor: That’s a bad idea. Instead, become a plumber. You’ll make more money. If you think that sounds crazy, that’s because it is. But that’s precisely the message from noted investor and Libertarian Peter Thiel, who sees education as a liability rather than an asset.

Silicon Valley needs humanities students

Quit your technology job. Get a Ph.D in the humanities. That’s the way to get ahead in the technology sector. That, at least, is what philosopher Damon Horowitz told a crowd of attendees at the BiblioTech Conference at Stanford University in 2011.

The gangsters of Silicon Valley

President Obama has been touting patents as a way to create jobs and increase U.S. competitiveness. “These are jobs and businesses of the future just waiting to be created,” he said of patent applications last September, “somewhere in that stack of applications could be the next technological breakthrough, the next miracle drug, the next idea that will launch the next Fortune 500 company.”

My wasted day on Capitol Hill

With the economy still in the doldrums, our political leaders are desperate to find ways to boost economic growth. Innovation and entrepreneurship are among the most obvious pathways to a solution. Both were the subject of a hearing held by the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship chaired by Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.), Wednesday. I was asked to participate in the discussion with other academics, government officials and entrepreneurs.