Web 2.0: MC Hammer reveals deep search product WireDoo

Is there something wrong with search? There are many answers to that question, and rapper M.C. Hammer took the stage at the Web 2.0 Summit with his own, WiredDoo, a deep search solution. With the tagline, “Search once, see what’s related,” Hammer said that with any product there is always room for improvement, so there’s nothing wrong with today’s search.

Michael Dell says confusion at HP has given Dell its opportunity

Michael Dell, founder and chief executive of Dell, said that the recent uncertainty at Hewlett-Packard has been good for Dell in landing new customers. HP is the world’s No. 1 PC maker, but its place in the market became uncertain when the previous CEO, Leo Apotheker, announced he would study whether to spin off the PC division. Since enterprise customers hate uncertainty, Dell said his list of new customers has been growing.

The who's who of the digerati: A gargantuan Web 2.0 Summit photo gallery

The Web 2.0 Summit drew the who’s who of the digerati to San Francisco this week. Chief among them were conference organizers Tim O’Reilly (left) and John Battelle (right). O’Reilly opened the conference talking about the theme of “points of control,” or key pieces of technology that companies can use to dominate their markets. O’Reilly started out with a plea that companies not engage in destructive competition. Rather, he suggested they find the Blue Ocean of untapped markets and new users. The photo gallery below shows many of the speakers and a brief summary of what they talked about. Enjoy. And for a fun comparison, check out last year’s photo gallery.

Lessons for innovators from building a Rube Goldberg machine

Believe it or not, the making of a video for the song This Too Shall Pass by the band OK Go has lessons for would-be innovators. The creator of the video, Adam Sadowsky, said the process of creating the complex machine for the video was a lot like what entrepreneurs go through when developing a new product or service.

Mark Zuckerberg defends Facebook's aggressive social strategy

Facebook has taken a lot of flack for an aggressive, “opt-out” strategy around some of its products — specifically, the fact that your Facebook friends can tag you in Photos without your permission, and that they can now add you to Groups without your permission. Chief executive Mark Zuckerberg described some of the thinking behind that approach on-stage today at the Web 2.0 Summit.