Love your free players to unlock the full potential of free-to-play games

It’s already clear that free-to-play games are having a profound impact on the industry landscape. Their initial success is in large part driven by the frictionless reach being free enables. By removing the need to pay up front, a game can reach an audience that’s as much as 10 to 25 times larger. Anyone who owns a smart mobile device or a PC with an Internet connection is now a prospective player.

With 1.3B tanks obliterated and 30M players, Wargaming.net plans to conquer the online gaming world (interview)

Let’s Battle. That’s a particularly apt slogan for Wargaming.net. The  has scored big with its World of Tanks game, a hardcore massively multiplayer online game that lets you battle your friends in World War II tanks. Since it launched in April 2011, the game has gotten more than 30 million players worldwide.Those players are so engaged in the realistic 3D game that they have obliterated 1.3 billion tanks to date.

Wargaming.net lead designer expects massive aerial clashes in World of Warplanes (interview)

Wargaming.net has earned its stripes in PC gaming. Known for the Massive Assault series, Order of War and other titles, the PC development has now started cashing in big time on its hardcore gaming know-how with the success of its massively multiplayer online world World of Tanks.That game has more than 18 million players worldwide, a massive hit that has given the company resources to launch its next big online game worlds. The company has more than 800 employees, making it one of the powerhouses of downloadable online gaming on a global scale.

VentureBeat’s photo gallery captures the noise of E3 2011 (part 1)

The only thing bad about an E3 photo gallery is that you can’t hear the sounds. E3, the video game industry’s trade show, is an extremely loud trade show, with game exhibitors blasting sounds as much as they can to draw attention to their games. The convention drew an estimated 45,000 people to Los Angeles this week. We were there from the first parties to the last. We saw many of the 35,000 screens showing off new games. Here’s the show in pictures.