The DeanBeat: Can Microsoft’s Kinect gain cred from hardcore gamers?

Microsoft’s Kinect has always held out tantalizing promises. As a user interface, it brings computing devices to the edge of greatness but falls just a little short of our dreams of the Star Trek holodeck or the cool transparent, gesture-controlled computer that Tom Cruise used in the sci-fi film Minority Report. You can fantasize about being a Jedi Knight in Kinect Star Wars…until the system fails to recognize your lightsaber attack and you get pummeled instead.

GamesBeat Weekly Roundup

Here are some of the stories that ran on GamesBeat this week. We’re running more articles exclusively in the GamesBeat section of VentureBeat, particularly when they’re mainly of interest to our game readers. The broader-interest posts will continue to run on VentureBeat as well. Please visit the GamesBeat section to catch up on the latest game news. We’re ramping up our game coverage, so you’ll find a larger amount of deeper news at GamesBeat.

Sine Mora, a side-scrolling shooter for the masses (review)

Sine Mora inspires a certain amount of wondering about what a 2D shooter really needs in the way of production values. Does it need an original soundtrack by a big-name composer? Does it need an extensive, otherworldly backstory? Does it need an elaborate time-travel plotline about saving someone’s life in the past and avenging his death in the present? Does it need poetically-written cutscenes and voice-overs delivered in Hungarian?

Steel Battalion Heavy Armor combines Kinect and controller commands (hands-on preview)

Steel Battalion Heavy Armor is one of the new hardcore games for the Xbox 360 which makes the daring design decision of using the Kinect motion-sensing gesture controls in addition to play with a traditional game controller. You use your arms to control the user interface inside your giant mech, known as a Vertical Tank, but you use the controller to fire your machine gun or cannon at enemies.

The Simpsons Arcade takes us back to the bowling alley (review)

1991 was a good year for The Simpsons. Some all-time classic episodes aired, the series won a couple of Emmy awards, Bart Simpson t-shirts were still in fashion, and the family starred in an A-list arcade game. It was a better year than 2011, where the series closed in on its 500th episode while a few fans kept up the old argument over when the exact shark-jumping moment happened.