Heroku founder: Y Combinator developer tools request is a very big deal

While it might not seem so to outsiders, Y Combinator’s new Developer Tools Request for Startups (RFS) is a big deal. (Editor’s note: The deadline to apply is tomorrow.) This is a request from one of the biggest tech incubators for startups that make developer tools, and it’s an important sign of the increasing value and prominence of developer products and the companies behind them. And I’m thrilled about it.

Meet the five Google.org-backed startups that are part tech startups, part non-profits

When New York City teacher Charles Best started DonorsChoose — a nonprofit that lets teachers crowdfund projects and supplies for their classrooms — in 2000, philanthropy was still done the old-fashioned way: Wealthy folks went to charity galas, local organizations held food drives in parking lots, and technology like websites, smartphones, and online payments had no presence.

Y Combinator-backed Zidisha has been stomping down non-performing loans with some extra tech

Yesterday, a new crop of startups from Y Combinator’s (YC) accelerator presented to a full house in the hopes of investment, press, and general buzz, and among them will be some non-profit companies. After YC accepted its first non-profit, Watsi, in its Winter 2013 class, it’s been steadily growing the number of non-profits in its classes, and Zidisha had the chance to participated in the Winter 2014 class.