I’m sure you all know about the different high school demographics. But I’ll bet you only know about this one if you go to high school right now: the Call of Duty 4 kids. There are countless people who used to be just those cool kids who were great at sports and are now hardcore Call of Duty players. All the time I hear conversations like this one: 

Generic guy 1:“Hey man,  what prestige are you on now?”

Generic guy 2: “I’m on five, what are you?”

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Generic guy 1:“Eleven.”

Generic guy 2:“Wow, have you unlocked that sweet sniper yet?”

Generic guy 1:“The Barret 50 cal, yeah. It’s sweet.”

I don’t play Call of Duty too much, so the amount of guns people can name astounds me. Ordinary people who don’t associate themselves with any games besides Call of Duty have conversations where they talk about all their new M478 39 cal assault grenade pistol with an Acog scope that they just got (there can be a lot of fun to be had with making up gun names, as you can see). And I haven’t even touched on Nazi Zombies yet.

These kids think of Nazi Zombies as a sport, always bragging about the level they got to or the glitch they found.  Me and my friends have played a little Nazi Zombies, but I personally think many other games make better Horde mode-esque games (I’m looking at you, Uncharted 2).

What does the community think? Do you guys ever see this in your communities, high school or not (I know there aren’t too many of us whippersnappers on Bitmob)? Is your 79-year old Grandma seven prestige? Give me the juicy details.

I’ll leave you guys with a parting shot:

My friend is actually ten prestige in Call of Duty 4, but is also one of the most popular kids in school.

 

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