Here’s our roundup of the week’s tech business news. First, the most popular stories VentureBeat published in the last seven days:

End of the Nook? Amazon announces 14-day Kindle ebook lending — Amazon announced that it will be introducing a 14-day lending feature for Kindle ebooks later this year. The move brings the Kindle up to date with Barnes and Noble’s rival Nook e-reader, which has touted 14-day book lending as a key feature.

Digg’s former CEO Jay Adelson has “no regrets” about not taking offers — Adelson said Monday that he doesn’t regret not accepting offers to sell Digg to large media companies before the site began a decline that led to 37 percent layoffs this week.

Google exec: Android was “best deal ever” — Buying Android Inc., the wireless-software startup founded by Andy Rubin, was Google’s “best deal ever,” said David Lawee, vice president of corporate development at the search giant.

Dropbox CEO: Why search advertising failed us — In Dropbox’s early days, the company did all the things that startups are “supposed” to do, like buying ads on Google’s search results through AdWords and hiring a public relations firm, according to chief executive Drew Houston. And the results were “horrific”.

How Apple narrowly avoided another “antennagate” with white iPhone 4 camera — Apple may be holding back its promised white iPhone 4 in order to avoid a scandal surrounding the phone’s camera.

And here are five more articles we think are important, thought-provoking, fun, or all of the above:

nightscapeThe super grid. Coming soon to a power outlet near you — The electricity grid needs to change. We look at how those changes are going to happen.

Review: Nokia’s N8 is a hardware beast trapped in Symbian’s cage — Why can’t Nokia sell phones to Americans? VentureBeat’s Devindra Hardawar says it’s because of phones like the N8.

Filmmaker James Cameron wants us to be technologists with a conscience — In a conversation with Google chief executive Eric Schmidt, film director James Cameron urged technology-minded people to become better stewards of the planet. That was a fundamental message of Cameron’s blockbuster film Avatar, and it’s also the advice he has for people who have their heads down building cool technology in Silicon Valley.

Use less power at peak, and pay less? Duh, it’s about time — For the past century, buying electricity from your utility has been about the same. Finally, that’s changing.

What seed-stage star Christine Herron’s move to Intel Capital means — Well-connected early-stage investor Christine Herron is leaving seed-stage venture-capital firm First Round Capital to join Intel Capital, the chipmaker’s corporate venture arm. Does Herron’s jump show that corporate venture-capital funds are no longer waiting on the sidelines when it comes to seed funding? In Herron’s own opinion: Yes.