I was very excited for Fable 3. Until I played it.

 If you have spent any time with Fable 3 you have no doubt run into any number of game breaking bugs. The game's problems run anywhere from destroying your save data, serious frame rate issues, one of the game's major characters turning into a mute, etc.

As games continue to grow in size and complexity bugs are becoming more of a problem. And I don't know about you, but I'm beginning to feel more like a beta tester than a gamer. The Fable 3 team posted a page on their website that encouraged players to submit bugs to the developer Lion Head to assist the team in fixing the game. Fine. I spent sixty bucks but in the spirit of cooperation I felt obligated to do my part and help out. To their credit, Lion Head has promised that a patch is on it's way and would address many of the problems that all of us are having.

Heres where I get pissed.

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Before fixing Fable 3's numerous problems Lion Head announced paid downloadable content.

http://www.1up.com/news/fable-3-understone-dlc-next-week

Does anyone else feel like this is completely unfair? Before I am able to receive a patch to fix your game you want to stick your hand in my pocket? Again? 

Don't get me wrong, I am staunchly in favor of DLC. That's not the issue here. Perhaps I'm crazy but I feel like before you ask me for more money you at least have the common courtesy to fix your broken product. 

It's getting to the point where it doesn't pay to be an early adopter. Which is unfortunate because I'm pretty sure thats where game developers and publishers make most of their money.

So, in closing, thanks but no thanks Lion Head. I won't be buying any content for your busted game. And in the future, I'll just wait for the Platinum Hit's version of the game, which will no doubt be cheaper.  

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