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In the name of transparency, Apple has revealed the top reasons why it rejects apps from its App Store.

The most common reason Apple blocks apps isn’t censorship, as some folks might believe. About 14 percent of apps rejected during the seven-day period ending Aug. 28 were rejected because more information was needed.

The second most popular reason, coming in at 8 percent, is that the apps have bugs or cause crashes. The third one is pretty vague: About 6 percent of apps are rejected because they do not comply with the terms in the Developer Program License Agreement.


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Apple’s decisions are often shrouded in mystery, but the post shows the company is making efforts to communicate better to the millions of developers who are submitting apps by the thousands.

Still, there are experts who specialize in helping people understand this kind of information. Michael Ehrenberg, a former Apple marketing manager, will give a talk at our upcoming GamesBeat University section of GamesBeat 2014 on what you can do to improve the chances of getting your app featured in the Apple App Store.

In its post, Apple said, “You should submit your app for review only when it is complete and ready to be published. Make sure to thoroughly test your app on devices and fix all bugs before submitting.”

It noted that all links in an app must be functional. The app must include a link to a privacy policy (especially for kids’ titles), as well as a link for user support. Apps can’t have placeholder images. Descriptions have to be accurate, and your app can’t be misleading. The user interface has to be clean. The app has to display ads properly if it uses them, and the app should be “engaging and useful.” You’re also not allowed to resubmit similar apps that have already been rejected.

Why Apple rejects apps

Above: Why Apple rejects apps

Image Credit: Apple

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