Interoperability among the electronic health records systems at different hospitals or clinics is still a big problem. Not only is it a technical challenge, but there are often competitive reasons not to share. Hospitals and clinics are businesses, after all, and they compete with each other.

This does patients no good of course. It means that they often have personal clinical data spread around numerous providers, and their personal health record is often incomplete or outdated.

That’s the problem Hello Doctor is trying to solve. The startup’s app can pull clinical data from a number of hospitals and clinics via an application programming interface (API). The patient can then share the records with her current primary care doctor, for instance. If the records are on paper, the patient can share them with her doctor by photographing or scanning them and emailing the images.

Some of the best minds in digital health will be discussing the relationship between the personal health record and the electronic health record at VentureBeat’s HealthBeat conference October 27-28. 

The Tel Aviv and Palo Alto, Calif.-based company says it has picked up $700K in new funding from some angel investors from Facebook, Google, and a couple of pharma companies. Hello Doctor CEO Maayan Cohen said the investors preferred to remain unnamed for the moment. It’s previously taken funding from BlueRun Ventures.

Cohen told VentureBeat that the app can also now interface with about half of U.S. hospitals.

Hello Doctor has also integrated Apple’s HealthKit into its app, so it can begin to collect data from other apps and devices that connect to the platform and display data in iOS 8’s Health app. For instance, the Hello Doctor app could begin collecting weight information from a Withings connected scale, or blood sugar information from one of the growing number of HealthKit-connected glucose meters, to further populate the personal health record.

“Hello Doctor is the first mobile solution to aggregate all of our medical data in one place — online lab results, paper records, and blood pressure trends,” Cohen said in a statement. “This consolidated view allows our patients and their doctors to better understand their medical condition and can save lives.”