Searching for the Loch Ness monster just got easier.

On the 81st anniversary of the infamous “Surgeon’s Photograph,” Google has allowed users to explore the surface of Loch Ness using Street View.

This comes as a welcome update from the Apple Maps non-sighting that disappointed armchair cryptozoologists everywhere.

Just navigate over to Loch Ness. You’ll see something is different right away — the typical “Stick Man” has been replaced by a cartoon Nessie. Drag Nessie onto the lake and you’re now free to zip along the surface of the 23-mile stretch of murky water. There are even some underwater photographs!

In its announcement Google said that they worked with Adrian Shine, Scotland’s leading Nessie expert, who has logged more than 1,000 different sightings.

 

Taking photos every 2 or 3 seconds, the team managed to capture the eerie solitude of Scotland’s most notorious body of water.

Loch Ness is the largest Scottish loch by volume, containing more water than all the lakes of England and Wales combined. It is also 800 feet deep. Because it has a high amount of peat moss suspended in the water, it is astoundingly murky. This huge, dark expanse is exactly why the legend has persisted for so many years.

As a person who fears dark water, I have to thank Google. I can now conduct my own cryptid research from the safety of my Brooklyn apartment.

The most interesting fact of all, though, was Google’s mention that there are more searches for Loch Ness every year than Buckingham Palace.

The truth is out there, folks. Now you can see for yourself.