Tech companies are throwing their support behind Ahmed Mohamed, a U.S. student arrested on Monday for bringing a clock to school. The public relations frenzy blew up today as the details of the incident went viral.

Ahmed, a 14-year-old student in Texas, built a digital clock and brought it to his high school. He wanted to show his teachers, but instead of receiving praise, he was arrested. The principal called the police, having mistaken the gadget for a fake bomb.

Facebook cofounder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg was the first to show his support. He invited Ahmed to visit the company’s headquarters:

Google was next in line, asking Ahmed to visit the company’s science fair this weekend. Timely message, although delivered on Twitter, not Google+:

Speaking of Twitter, the company probably made the best offer of the three so far. Ahmed was offered an internship:

https://twitter.com/twitter/status/644261776146632704

The three tech giants weren’t the only ones to jump on the bandwagon.

Foursquare also wants Ahmed to keep inventing:

Box CEO Aaron Levie thinks Ahmed is much more interested in enterprise software:

Autodesk CEO Carl Bass wants to build something with Ahmed, too:

Ahmed’s story has resulted in a massive outpouring of outrage, praise, and sympathy. More and more people want to support the ninth grader, who was handcuffed, led out of his school, put on a three-day suspension, and interrogated by five police officers as to why he was trying to make a bomb. On Wednesday, police finally said they would not charge him.

Support is pouring in from everywhere you look.

President Barack Obama wants Ahmed to visit the White House:

Hillary Clinton wants Ahmed to keep at it:

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield wants Ahmed to check out his science show in Toronto:

At what point does this PR frenzy turn into something more than just support for one boy? Ahmed did not deserve the treatment he received, but tech companies should use this as an opportunity to do something beyond extending invitations to Ahmed.

Maybe September 14, the day of Ahmed’s arrest, can be turned into an annual day of action to help fight discrimination against students and people everywhere.