Google today launched Chrome 53 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This release is mainly focused on developers, but there’s no reason for anyone to hold off on updating. You can update to the latest version now using the browser’s built-in silent updater, or download it directly from google.com/chrome.

Chrome is arguably more than a browser: With over 1 billion users, it’s a major platform that web developers have to consider. In fact, with Chrome’s regular additions and changes, developers have to keep up to ensure they are taking advantage of everything available.

Chrome 53 also brings Google’s Material Design mantra, first introduced at the company’s I/O conference in June 2014, to Windows. Chrome for iOS got Material Design back in January 2015 with version 40 and Chrome for Mac received Material Design last month in version 52.

Chrome 53 supports Shadow DOM V1, which allows an element to encapsulate its style and child DOM away from the main document. This is useful when trying to maintain large code bases of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Chrome will support V0 of the API until enough developers have moved to V1.

Other developer features in this release include:

Chrome 53 also includes 33 security fixes, of which Google chose to highlight the following:

  • [$7500][628942] High CVE-2016-5147: Universal XSS in Blink. Credit to anonymous
  • [$7500][621362] High CVE-2016-5148: Universal XSS in Blink. Credit to anonymous
  • [$7500][573131] High CVE-2016-5149: Script injection in extensions. Credit to Max Justicz  (http://web.mit.edu/maxj/www/)
  • [$5000][637963] High CVE-2016-5150: Use after free in Blink. Credit to anonymous
  • [$5000][634716] High CVE-2016-5151: Use after free in PDFium. Credit to anonymous
  • [$5000][629919] High CVE-2016-5152: Heap overflow in PDFium. Credit to GiWan Go of Stealien
  • [$3500][631052] High CVE-2016-5153: Use after destruction in Blink. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG
  • [$3000][633002] High CVE-2016-5154: Heap overflow in PDFium. Credit to anonymous
  • [$3000][630662] High CVE-2016-5155: Address bar spoofing. Credit to anonymous
  • [$3000][625404] High CVE-2016-5156: Use after free in event bindings. Credit to jinmo123
  • [$TBD][632622] High CVE-2016-5157: Heap overflow in PDFium. Credit to anonymous
  • [$TBD][628890] High CVE-2016-5158: Heap overflow in PDFium. Credit to GiWan Go of Stealien
  • [$TBD][628304] High CVE-2016-5159: Heap overflow in PDFium. Credit to GiWan Go of Stealien
  • [$n/a][622420] Medium CVE-2016-5161: Type confusion in Blink. Credit to 62600BCA031B9EB5CB4A74ADDDD6771E working with Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative
  • [$n/a][589237] Medium CVE-2016-5162: Extensions web accessible resources bypass. Credit to Nicolas Golubovic
  • [$3000][609680] Medium CVE-2016-5163: Address bar spoofing. Credit to Rafay Baloch PTCL Etisalat (http://rafayhackingarticles.net)
  • [$2000][637594] Medium CVE-2016-5164: Universal XSS using DevTools. Credit to anonymous
  • [$1000][618037] Medium CVE-2016-5165: Script injection in DevTools. Credit to Gregory Panakkal
  • [$TBD][616429] Medium CVE-2016-5166: SMB Relay Attack via Save Page As. Credit to Gregory Panakkal
  • [$500][576867] Low CVE-2016-5160: Extensions web accessible resources bypass. Credit to @l33terally, FogMarks.com (@FogMarks)
  • [642598] CVE-2016-5167: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives.

If you add all those up, you’ll see Google spent a whopping $56,500 in bug bounties this time around — and that number is lowballed, given all the rewards that have yet to be decided. As always, the security fixes alone should be enough incentive for you to upgrade.

Chrome 53 for Android and iOS are also on their way, but Google has not shared exactly when they will ship. Chrome 54 will arrive in October.